THERE ARE OVER 50 DIFFERENT PRODUCT CATEGORIES

HERO Financing is available for a wide array of home energy and water efficient products and renewable energy systems. With new products being added every day you are sure to find the right ones for your home energy project. If your product is not listed just give us a call to see if it meets the requirements for HERO Financing.

Product eligibility may vary by location. 

Electric Vehicle Charging Stations
Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

California is leading the nation in clean vehicle adoption with more plug-in electric vehicles on its roadways than any other state and some 3,000 new vehicles joining them each month. This shift away from gasoline and diesel brings many environmental and economic benefits including less air pollution and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

An electric vehicle charging station, also called EV charging station, electric recharging point, charging point and EVSE (Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment), is an element in an infrastructure that supplies electric energy for the recharging of plug-in electric vehicles, including all-electric cars, and plug-in hybrids.

HERO-eligible Level 2 charging stations supply 240V electricity, similar to what an electric dryer or oven uses. Power is supplied through a charging unit and a cord that improves safety by waiting to send power to the plug until it is plugged into a vehicle. Level 2 chargers allow for a wide range of charging speeds, all the way up to 19.2 kilowatts (kW), or about 70 miles of range per hour of charging.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

California is leading the nation in clean vehicle adoption with more plug-in electric vehicles on its roadways than any other state and some 3,000 new vehicles joining them each month. This shift away from gasoline and diesel brings many environmental and economic benefits including less air pollution and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

An electric vehicle charging station, also called EV charging station, electric recharging point, charging point and EVSE (Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment), is an element in an infrastructure that supplies electric energy for the recharging of plug-in electric vehicles, including all-electric cars, and plug-in hybrids.

HERO-eligible Level 2 charging stations supply 240V electricity, similar to what an electric dryer or oven uses. Power is supplied through a charging unit and a cord that improves safety by waiting to send power to the plug until it is plugged into a vehicle. Level 2 chargers allow for a wide range of charging speeds, all the way up to 19.2 kilowatts (kW), or about 70 miles of range per hour of charging.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Charging Stations must be certified as meeting the Underwriters Laboratory Subject 2594 Standard Testng for Charging Stations.
  2. Charging Station must be Level 2 with SAE J1772 standard charging plug.
  3. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Fuel Cell Generation Systems
Fuel Cell Generation Systems

A home fuel cell is an alternative energy technology that increases efficiency by simultaneously generating power and heat from one unit, on- site within a home. This allows a residence to reduce overall fossil fuel consumption, reduce carbon emissions and reduce overall utility costs, while being able to operate 24 hours a day. Residential fuel cells are now becoming available to fulfill both electricity and heat demand from one system. Fuel cell technology in a compact system converts natural gas, propane, and even hydrogen fuel into both electricity and heat, producing water vapor, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of NOx as exhaust.

Most home fuel cells fit either inside a mechanical room, garage, or outside, and can be discreetly sited to fit within a building's design. The system is designed to operate in one compact unit, similar to the pacakge design of a furnace or water heater systems. Some of the newer home fuel cells can generate anywhere between 3 to 5 kilowatts, which are optimal for larger high-energy homes with pools, spas, and/or hydronic radiant heating systems.

Deploying the fuel cell system’s heat energy efficiently to a home hot water applications further displaces the electricity or gas otherwise burned to create that heat, which further reduces overall energy bills.

The California Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) currently offers financial incentives up to $1.83/watt for qualified fuel cell systems. Click here for more information.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Fuel Cell Generation Systems

Fuel Cell Generation Systems

A home fuel cell is an alternative energy technology that increases efficiency by simultaneously generating power and heat from one unit, on- site within a home. This allows a residence to reduce overall fossil fuel consumption, reduce carbon emissions and reduce overall utility costs, while being able to operate 24 hours a day. Residential fuel cells are now becoming available to fulfill both electricity and heat demand from one system. Fuel cell technology in a compact system converts natural gas, propane, and even hydrogen fuel into both electricity and heat, producing water vapor, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of NOx as exhaust.

Most home fuel cells fit either inside a mechanical room, garage, or outside, and can be discreetly sited to fit within a building's design. The system is designed to operate in one compact unit, similar to the pacakge design of a furnace or water heater systems. Some of the newer home fuel cells can generate anywhere between 3 to 5 kilowatts, which are optimal for larger high-energy homes with pools, spas, and/or hydronic radiant heating systems.

Deploying the fuel cell system’s heat energy efficiently to a home hot water applications further displaces the electricity or gas otherwise burned to create that heat, which further reduces overall energy bills.

The California Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) currently offers financial incentives up to $1.83/watt for qualified fuel cell systems. Click here for more information.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. System must be certified as meeting the ANSI/CSA America FC1 Standard.
  2. System must be installed per manufacturer specifications.
  3. System must be installed in accordance with local code and/or the Standard for the Installation of Stationary Fuel Cell Powe Plants, NFPA 853, the National Fuel Gas Code, ANSIZ223.1/NFPA 54, National Electrical Code, NFPA 70, as applicable.

Close
Small Wind Turbine
Small Wind Turbine

According to the US Department of Energy, a small wind energy system can provide you with a practical and economical source of electricity if:

  • Your property has a good wind resource
  • Your home or business is located on at least one acre of land in a rural area
  • Your local zoning codes or covenants allow wind turbines
  • Your average electricity bills are $150 per month or more
  • Your property is in a remote location without easy access to utility lines
  • You are comfortable with long-term investments

Sufficient land space usually is an issue due to needing to build a tower for the wind turbine, noise and view issues (as to your family and your neighbors), and zoning and safety issues, including adequate space for the tower to topple over without crossing your property's boundaries.  The American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) estimates that the installed cost of an average small wind turbine 10 kW system is $32,000, while the US Dept. of Energy estimates that a 10kW system, including the 80 foot tower, may cost as much as $50,000. A 10 kW Solar Photovoltaic system, in comparison, would have an average cost of $80,000. A US Wind Resource Map can be a helpful resource in determining the potential for wind power on your property. For more information, see this publication from the US Department of Energy.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Small Wind Turbine

Small Wind Turbine

According to the US Department of Energy, a small wind energy system can provide you with a practical and economical source of electricity if:

  • Your property has a good wind resource
  • Your home or business is located on at least one acre of land in a rural area
  • Your local zoning codes or covenants allow wind turbines
  • Your average electricity bills are $150 per month or more
  • Your property is in a remote location without easy access to utility lines
  • You are comfortable with long-term investments

Sufficient land space usually is an issue due to needing to build a tower for the wind turbine, noise and view issues (as to your family and your neighbors), and zoning and safety issues, including adequate space for the tower to topple over without crossing your property's boundaries.  The American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) estimates that the installed cost of an average small wind turbine 10 kW system is $32,000, while the US Dept. of Energy estimates that a 10kW system, including the 80 foot tower, may cost as much as $50,000. A 10 kW Solar Photovoltaic system, in comparison, would have an average cost of $80,000. A US Wind Resource Map can be a helpful resource in determining the potential for wind power on your property. For more information, see this publication from the US Department of Energy.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product msut be certified by the Small Wind Certification Council as meeting the requirements of the AWEA Small Wind Turbine Performance and Safety Standard (9.1-2009).
  2. Product must be grid connected unless the property is not currently connected to the grid.
  3. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications

Close
Air Sealing
Air Sealing

A "drafty" house is the result of air leakage, or air infiltration, through cracks and openings. While many are easy to locate, such as around windows and doors, many are hidden in attics and crawlspaces, behind the stairs, around outlets and openings for appliances, and so on. Properly sealing these leaks with caulk, spray foam, and weather stripping can greatly impact both your comfort and your utility bills as the furnace and air conditioner have to work less hard to keep your home at the proper temperature. (Note: that sealing leaks will not solve any problems related to lack of insulation which is needed to reduce heat loss.) Please visit Energy Savers for additional information.

Using an air sealing expert to complete this work can be important for several reasons - they should have the diagnostic tools to detect the hidden leaks that are difficult to locate (for example, infrared camera and blower door equipment), they should know the proper techniques to complete the work, and be able to test afterward to determine whether additional ventilation is required for combustion safety purposes. While some homeowners may be concerned about a too tightly sealed house, this is not likely the case with older homes. Please visit Energy Star for additional information.

Most experts agree that caulking and weather stripping alone should pay for itself in energy savings within a year. (Energy Savers) For particularly "leaky" homes, air infiltration may account for 30 percent or more of the home's heating and cooling costs and contribute to moisture, dust, insect and other issues with the home (DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory).

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this improvement, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please see the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Air Sealing

Air Sealing

A "drafty" house is the result of air leakage, or air infiltration, through cracks and openings. While many are easy to locate, such as around windows and doors, many are hidden in attics and crawlspaces, behind the stairs, around outlets and openings for appliances, and so on. Properly sealing these leaks with caulk, spray foam, and weather stripping can greatly impact both your comfort and your utility bills as the furnace and air conditioner have to work less hard to keep your home at the proper temperature. (Note: that sealing leaks will not solve any problems related to lack of insulation which is needed to reduce heat loss.) Please visit Energy Savers for additional information.

Using an air sealing expert to complete this work can be important for several reasons - they should have the diagnostic tools to detect the hidden leaks that are difficult to locate (for example, infrared camera and blower door equipment), they should know the proper techniques to complete the work, and be able to test afterward to determine whether additional ventilation is required for combustion safety purposes. While some homeowners may be concerned about a too tightly sealed house, this is not likely the case with older homes. Please visit Energy Star for additional information.

Most experts agree that caulking and weather stripping alone should pay for itself in energy savings within a year. (Energy Savers) For particularly "leaky" homes, air infiltration may account for 30 percent or more of the home's heating and cooling costs and contribute to moisture, dust, insect and other issues with the home (DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory).

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this improvement, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please see the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

Contractors should follow the Building Performance Institute ("BPI") standards, Energy Star guidelines and/or ASHRAE 62.2-7 2007 Ventilation Standards for air sealing and weatherization.

It is mandatory that air sealing levels be measured by a blower door test before and after improvements are made. A copy of the blower door test results (CFM50) before and after improvement products are installed must be included with the Funding Request Form. Mechanical ventilation should be installed if natural ventilation is below the minimum levels specified in ASHRAE 62.2-7 2007 Ventilation Standards.


Close
Attic Insulation
Attic Insulation

When considering insulation, the attic is generally the first place to start, as most of your heat will rise and go through your ceiling to the attic if there is inadequate or ineffective insulation. It is also often one of the easier places to access.

Before adding new insulation, however, two evaluations steps should be completed first:

  1. Determine the existing insulation's R-value and whether it needs to be augmented or replaced due to damage or age
  2. Inspect attic-to-home sealing and safety protection (lights, vents, etc.)

The two most common types of insulation used in home attics are loose-fill and batt insulation, with a variety of materials available for both types. For more information about insulation choices, please visit the Energy Savers website.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Attic Insulation

Attic Insulation

When considering insulation, the attic is generally the first place to start, as most of your heat will rise and go through your ceiling to the attic if there is inadequate or ineffective insulation. It is also often one of the easier places to access.

Before adding new insulation, however, two evaluations steps should be completed first:

  1. Determine the existing insulation's R-value and whether it needs to be augmented or replaced due to damage or age
  2. Inspect attic-to-home sealing and safety protection (lights, vents, etc.)

The two most common types of insulation used in home attics are loose-fill and batt insulation, with a variety of materials available for both types. For more information about insulation choices, please visit the Energy Savers website.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Attic insulation must be installed with a total R-value ≥ 38.
  2. Insulation must be installed per Title 24 Quality Insulation Installation (QII) standards. 

 

Close
Cool Roof - Prescriptive
Cool Roof - Prescriptive

Cool roofs are roofing products that reflect more of the sun's rays than standard roofing products. According to Energy Star, Energy Star qualified roof products can lower roof surface temperatures by up to 100 degrees. This reduces the amount of heat transferred inside the building and reduces the amount of air conditioning needed, including a possible 10-15% reduction in air conditioning for the hottest hours of the day.

According to Energy Savers, standard or dark roofs can reach temperatures of 150°F or more in the summer sun. A cool roof under the same conditions could stay more than 50°F cooler. Decreasing the roof operating temperature may also extend the life of the roof.

Cool roofs are generally considered most effective in areas with longer periods of warm weather that require significant usage of air-conditioners and other cooling methods.

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this improvement, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

Please visit Energy Star to find information on Federal Tax Credits for this product.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Cool Roof - Prescriptive

Cool Roof - Prescriptive

Cool roofs are roofing products that reflect more of the sun's rays than standard roofing products. According to Energy Star, Energy Star qualified roof products can lower roof surface temperatures by up to 100 degrees. This reduces the amount of heat transferred inside the building and reduces the amount of air conditioning needed, including a possible 10-15% reduction in air conditioning for the hottest hours of the day.

According to Energy Savers, standard or dark roofs can reach temperatures of 150°F or more in the summer sun. A cool roof under the same conditions could stay more than 50°F cooler. Decreasing the roof operating temperature may also extend the life of the roof.

Cool roofs are generally considered most effective in areas with longer periods of warm weather that require significant usage of air-conditioners and other cooling methods.

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this improvement, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

Please visit Energy Star to find information on Federal Tax Credits for this product.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Roofing product must meet the following specifications:

    • Low-Slope Roofs (≤ 2:12): ≥ 0.5 Aged Solar Reflectance
    • Steep-Slope Roofs (> 2:12): ≥ 0.15 Aged Solar Reflectance
  2. Roofing product must also meet California Title 24 requirements.
  3. Roofing product must be installed per manufacturer's specifications. 
 

Close
Cool Wall Coatings
Cool Wall Coatings

Cool wall systems are applied to a building’s exterior wall and are highly solar reflective. These solar reflective properties allow it to reduce wall surface temperatures thus reducing the amount of heat that’s transferred into the home. This reduction in heat transfer can reduce a home’s cooling needs.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Cool Wall Coatings

Cool Wall Coatings

Cool wall systems are applied to a building’s exterior wall and are highly solar reflective. These solar reflective properties allow it to reduce wall surface temperatures thus reducing the amount of heat that’s transferred into the home. This reduction in heat transfer can reduce a home’s cooling needs.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must have a solar reflectance rating greater than 0.5 as tested by a recognized third-party laboratory using the ASTM C1549-09 standard test method.
  2. Product manufacturer, brand, and model must be a pre-approved HERO Cool Wall Coating.
  3. Product primary application surface must be exterior wall surfaces of conditioned (heating and/or cooled) buildings.
  4. Product is only eligible for properties located within California Energy Commission Building Climate Zones 4 through 10 and 12 through 15. 
  5. Product is not eligible for properties located within CEC Building Climate Zones 1 through 3, 11, and 16.

  • Click here to check the CEC Building Climate Zone list to see if your property zip code is eligible for Cool Wall Coatings.  

Close
Radiant Barrier
Radiant Barrier

Radiant barriers are installed in the attic to reflect radiant heat that comes in through the roof so it has less of an opportunity to heat the attic. The greatest potential for energy savings occurs when a home has an air handler or duct system that is located in an unconditioned attic. Also, savings increase when the home is located in the hottest climates. Florida or parts of Arizona, for example, have a much greater potential for savings, with savings decreasing for areas with milder summer climates. Savings are also much lower if the air conditioning system and ducts are not located in the attic, but a radiant barrier may help with comfort levels and to reduce peak load for your air conditioner. For more information on radiant barriers please visit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory for DOE.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Radiant Barrier

Radiant Barrier

Radiant barriers are installed in the attic to reflect radiant heat that comes in through the roof so it has less of an opportunity to heat the attic. The greatest potential for energy savings occurs when a home has an air handler or duct system that is located in an unconditioned attic. Also, savings increase when the home is located in the hottest climates. Florida or parts of Arizona, for example, have a much greater potential for savings, with savings decreasing for areas with milder summer climates. Savings are also much lower if the air conditioning system and ducts are not located in the attic, but a radiant barrier may help with comfort levels and to reduce peak load for your air conditioner. For more information on radiant barriers please visit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory for DOE.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Radiant Barrier product must have Emissivity ≤ 0.1 and Reflectivity ≥ 0.9.
  2. Radiant barrier must be installed per manufacturer's specifications.  

Close
Under Floor Insulation
Under Floor Insulation

Insulating the floor over a crawl space requires taking into consideration moisture control (both over the ground and as to the insulation) and whether you have a vented or unvented crawl space. (Unvented crawl spaces may require insulation of the perimeter instead.)

Moisture control requirements will depend on your property and climate and should be evaluated by a contractor. Floor insulation also requires air sealing of the floor before installing insulation. (Energy Savers)

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Under Floor Insulation

Under Floor Insulation

Insulating the floor over a crawl space requires taking into consideration moisture control (both over the ground and as to the insulation) and whether you have a vented or unvented crawl space. (Unvented crawl spaces may require insulation of the perimeter instead.)

Moisture control requirements will depend on your property and climate and should be evaluated by a contractor. Floor insulation also requires air sealing of the floor before installing insulation. (Energy Savers)

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Under-floor insulation must be installed with R-value ≥ 19 to full joist depth.
  2. Insulation must be installed per Title 24 Quality Insulation Installation standards.   

Close
Wall Insulation
Wall Insulation

After attic insulation, wall insulation is the next most popular and effective place to put insulation when it comes to increasing the energy efficiency of your home. While there are many types of insulation available for walls, existing homes with finished walls require certain types of insulation that do not involve removing the interior drywall or the exterior siding. One possible option that does not require removing the walls involves creating small holes in the walls, blowing in loose fill or spray foam insulation, and then patching and painting afterward. (Energy Savers)

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Wall Insulation

Wall Insulation

After attic insulation, wall insulation is the next most popular and effective place to put insulation when it comes to increasing the energy efficiency of your home. While there are many types of insulation available for walls, existing homes with finished walls require certain types of insulation that do not involve removing the interior drywall or the exterior siding. One possible option that does not require removing the walls involves creating small holes in the walls, blowing in loose fill or spray foam insulation, and then patching and painting afterward. (Energy Savers)

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Wall insulation product must be installed to a total R-value ≥ 13 to full framing cavity depth.
  2. Insulation must be installed per Title 24 Quality Insulation Installation standards.

Close
Custom Product
Custom Product

If a property owner wishes to finance a Custom Product after their HERO Financing Application has been approved, the property owner must apply for approval of the Custom Product before purchase and installation. To do so, the property owner must complete the Custom Product Application and provide attachments that support information regarding:

  1. The Custom Product they wish to install
  2. The cost to install
  3. The basis for eligibility (energy savings, water savings, or renewable energy production)
The WRCOG HERO Program will determine what additional documentation must be submitted.

During Custom Product Application review, the WRCOG HERO Program may request additional documentation or additional contractor bid(s) for the proposed Custom Products if it is determined that the submitted bid(s) appear to be unreasonable as to cost or scope.
The WRCOG HERO Program reserves the right to deny any Custom Product Application. Reasons for denial may include any of the following:
  1. It appears that the proposed Custom Product is not cost effective;
  2. The claimed energy or water savings or renewable energy generation are not clearly supported;
  3. The Custom Product is too experimental or unreliable;
  4. The costs do not appear to be in conformance with industry standards;
  5. Installation of the Custom Product may violate local laws or regulations; or
  6. Any other reason determined valid by WRCOG.
If Custom Product Application is denied, the WRCOG HERO Program will provide a written explanation.

Custom Product

Custom Product

If a property owner wishes to finance a Custom Product after their HERO Financing Application has been approved, the property owner must apply for approval of the Custom Product before purchase and installation. To do so, the property owner must complete the Custom Product Application and provide attachments that support information regarding:

  1. The Custom Product they wish to install
  2. The cost to install
  3. The basis for eligibility (energy savings, water savings, or renewable energy production)
The WRCOG HERO Program will determine what additional documentation must be submitted.

During Custom Product Application review, the WRCOG HERO Program may request additional documentation or additional contractor bid(s) for the proposed Custom Products if it is determined that the submitted bid(s) appear to be unreasonable as to cost or scope.
The WRCOG HERO Program reserves the right to deny any Custom Product Application. Reasons for denial may include any of the following:
  1. It appears that the proposed Custom Product is not cost effective;
  2. The claimed energy or water savings or renewable energy generation are not clearly supported;
  3. The Custom Product is too experimental or unreliable;
  4. The costs do not appear to be in conformance with industry standards;
  5. Installation of the Custom Product may violate local laws or regulations; or
  6. Any other reason determined valid by WRCOG.
If Custom Product Application is denied, the WRCOG HERO Program will provide a written explanation.

Specification

Close
Energy Audit
Energy Audit

A comprehensive home energy audit is a service provided by a professional auditor who will use a variety of diagnostic tools and industry standard tests to determine the energy efficiency of your home. Along with an analysis of past utility bills, the following are some of the tools and room by room examination services a professional auditor can provide:

  1. A blower door which measures the extent of leaks in your building
  2. An infrared camera which shows heating and cooling problems caused by missing or poorly functioning insulation, difficult to detect air leaks and other sources of hot or cold air finding its way in and out of your home.
  3. A duct blaster which tests the level of leakage in your HVAC duct system (a significant percentage of your heated or cooled air can be lost to the outside in this way.)
  4. A flow hood which tests whether enough air is traveling through room vents.

Once all testing is completed, the auditor will provide a detailed report outlining specific, prioritized recommendations for the building based on energy savings and cost of any recommended work. See the Energy Star or Energy Saver websites for more detailed information.

There are a number of organizations that certify and/or train home energy auditors, including the Building Performance Institute (BPI), California Building Performance Contractors Association (CBPCA), CalCERTS or RESNET. Listings of BPI or HERS certified energy auditors and contractors are available from these websites:

Energy Audit

Energy Audit

A comprehensive home energy audit is a service provided by a professional auditor who will use a variety of diagnostic tools and industry standard tests to determine the energy efficiency of your home. Along with an analysis of past utility bills, the following are some of the tools and room by room examination services a professional auditor can provide:

  1. A blower door which measures the extent of leaks in your building
  2. An infrared camera which shows heating and cooling problems caused by missing or poorly functioning insulation, difficult to detect air leaks and other sources of hot or cold air finding its way in and out of your home.
  3. A duct blaster which tests the level of leakage in your HVAC duct system (a significant percentage of your heated or cooled air can be lost to the outside in this way.)
  4. A flow hood which tests whether enough air is traveling through room vents.

Once all testing is completed, the auditor will provide a detailed report outlining specific, prioritized recommendations for the building based on energy savings and cost of any recommended work. See the Energy Star or Energy Saver websites for more detailed information.

There are a number of organizations that certify and/or train home energy auditors, including the Building Performance Institute (BPI), California Building Performance Contractors Association (CBPCA), CalCERTS or RESNET. Listings of BPI or HERS certified energy auditors and contractors are available from these websites:

Specification

Specifications to be determined.

Close
Air Source Heat Pump
Air Source Heat Pump

Electric air-source heat pump, most commonly used in moderate climates like Southern California, operates by using the difference between outdoor air temperatures and indoor air temperatures to both cool and heat your home (Energy Star). When properly installed, an air-source heat pump can deliver one-and-a-half to three times more heat energy to a home than the electrical energy it consumes. This is possible because a heat pump moves heat rather than converting it from a fuel, like in combustion heating systems (Energy Savers).

More efficient Energy Star models can save you 9% or more over standard models and 20% over what you currently have in your home (Energy Star). Because air source heat pumps are usually powered by electricity, the higher cost of electricity will need to be evaluated by you and your contractor. In addition, air source heat pumps become less efficient once temperatures go below 41 degrees and do not function well in areas with extended periods of sub-freezing temperatures without gas heating as a backup.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Air Source Heat Pump

Air Source Heat Pump

Electric air-source heat pump, most commonly used in moderate climates like Southern California, operates by using the difference between outdoor air temperatures and indoor air temperatures to both cool and heat your home (Energy Star). When properly installed, an air-source heat pump can deliver one-and-a-half to three times more heat energy to a home than the electrical energy it consumes. This is possible because a heat pump moves heat rather than converting it from a fuel, like in combustion heating systems (Energy Savers).

More efficient Energy Star models can save you 9% or more over standard models and 20% over what you currently have in your home (Energy Star). Because air source heat pumps are usually powered by electricity, the higher cost of electricity will need to be evaluated by you and your contractor. In addition, air source heat pumps become less efficient once temperatures go below 41 degrees and do not function well in areas with extended periods of sub-freezing temperatures without gas heating as a backup.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be AHRI Certified and AHRI number must be provided.
  2. Product must meet ENERGY STAR certification requirements:

    • Split: SEER ≥ 14.5 and EER ≥ 12 and HSPF ≥ 8.2.
    • Package: SEER ≥ 14 and EER ≥ 11 and HSPF ≥ 8.0.
  3. Product must replace an existing product.
  4. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Attic Fan
Attic Fan

Attic fans are used during the heat of the day to remove superheated air from the attic by drawing cool air in from outside through the vents and pushing the hot air to the outside through the attic fan itself. Attic fans do not cool the house (like a whole house fan does), but help keep the house cooler by lowering the amount of heat coming from the attic through the ceiling. To be effective, an attic fan must be combined with adequate, unblocked attic vents and an attic that is well sealed from the rest of the house. Both wired and solar-powered attic fans are available and an automatic thermostat/timer is recommended (set to turn on when attic temperatures reach a certain maximum), especially with a wired fan, so the fan only operates on the hotter summer days when needed. See the Energy Star website for more detailed information.

For more information about how much money and energy this product could save you, please see the U.S. Department of Energy, Home Energy Saver .

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Attic Fan

Attic Fan

Attic fans are used during the heat of the day to remove superheated air from the attic by drawing cool air in from outside through the vents and pushing the hot air to the outside through the attic fan itself. Attic fans do not cool the house (like a whole house fan does), but help keep the house cooler by lowering the amount of heat coming from the attic through the ceiling. To be effective, an attic fan must be combined with adequate, unblocked attic vents and an attic that is well sealed from the rest of the house. Both wired and solar-powered attic fans are available and an automatic thermostat/timer is recommended (set to turn on when attic temperatures reach a certain maximum), especially with a wired fan, so the fan only operates on the hotter summer days when needed. See the Energy Star website for more detailed information.

For more information about how much money and energy this product could save you, please see the U.S. Department of Energy, Home Energy Saver .

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must controlled by a thermostat.
  2. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Biomass Furnace
Biomass Furnace

Today’s wood stove models feature improved energy efficiency, safety, and environmental performance. They produce almost no smoke, minimal ash, and require less firewood. While older uncertified stoves release 15 to 30 grams of smoke per hour, new stoves certified by the U.S. EPA produce only 2 to 7 grams of smoke per hour. Be sure to look for the EPA certification label on the back of the stove.

Click here to see a list of EPA Certified Wood Stoves.

Wood stoves come in different sizes and can be sized to heat a single room or an entire home.

Small stoves are suitable for heating a family room or a seasonal cottage. In larger homes with older central furnaces, you can use a small stove for "zone heating" a specific area of your home (family or living room). This can reduce fuel consumption, conserve energy and save you money while maintaining comfort.

Medium stoves are suitable for heating small houses, medium-sized energy-efficient houses, and cottages used in winter.

Large stoves are suitable for larger, open plan houses or older, leakier houses in colder climate zones.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Biomass Furnace

Biomass Furnace

Today’s wood stove models feature improved energy efficiency, safety, and environmental performance. They produce almost no smoke, minimal ash, and require less firewood. While older uncertified stoves release 15 to 30 grams of smoke per hour, new stoves certified by the U.S. EPA produce only 2 to 7 grams of smoke per hour. Be sure to look for the EPA certification label on the back of the stove.

Click here to see a list of EPA Certified Wood Stoves.

Wood stoves come in different sizes and can be sized to heat a single room or an entire home.

Small stoves are suitable for heating a family room or a seasonal cottage. In larger homes with older central furnaces, you can use a small stove for "zone heating" a specific area of your home (family or living room). This can reduce fuel consumption, conserve energy and save you money while maintaining comfort.

Medium stoves are suitable for heating small houses, medium-sized energy-efficient houses, and cottages used in winter.

Large stoves are suitable for larger, open plan houses or older, leakier houses in colder climate zones.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be certified and listed on EPA Certified Wood Stoves list.
  2. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Boiler
Boiler

Most homes in the US are heated by central furnaces or boilers. Boilers provide steam or hot water for heating. Boilers send steam through pipes to steam radiators or send hot water to baseboard radiators or radiant floor heating. Steam boilers are inherently less efficient, but efficient versions of boilers are available.

The efficiency rating for a boiler is measured by annual fuel utilization efficiency or AFUE, which is the ratio of heat produced for the home to use compared to the total energy consumed by the boiler. For example, a boiler with a 90% AFUE rating means that 90% of the total energy consumed can be used by the home for heating and 10% is lost to the atmosphere. Replacing an existing 60% AFUE boiler with a 90% AFUE boiler can save you 33% on your heating costs! See the Energy Savers for more detailed information.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Boiler

Boiler

Most homes in the US are heated by central furnaces or boilers. Boilers provide steam or hot water for heating. Boilers send steam through pipes to steam radiators or send hot water to baseboard radiators or radiant floor heating. Steam boilers are inherently less efficient, but efficient versions of boilers are available.

The efficiency rating for a boiler is measured by annual fuel utilization efficiency or AFUE, which is the ratio of heat produced for the home to use compared to the total energy consumed by the boiler. For example, a boiler with a 90% AFUE rating means that 90% of the total energy consumed can be used by the home for heating and 10% is lost to the atmosphere. Replacing an existing 60% AFUE boiler with a 90% AFUE boiler can save you 33% on your heating costs! See the Energy Savers for more detailed information.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be AHRI Certified and AHRI number must be provided.
  2. Product must meet ENERGY STAR certification requirments: AFUE ≥ 85%.
  3. Product must replace an existing product.
  4. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Central Air Conditioner
Central Air Conditioner
Central air conditioners work by moving air through a duct system, using supply ducts and registers to send cooled air to the home and return ducts and registers to send the warmer...
Central Air Conditioner

Central Air Conditioner

Central air conditioners work by moving air through a duct system, using supply ducts and registers to send cooled air to the home and return ducts and registers to send the warmer air back to the air conditioner again. There are two types of central air conditioners-split system units or packaged units. Split system units have an outdoor unit with a condenser and compressor and an indoor unit with the evaporator. The indoor unit will often be combined with either a furnace or the indoor unit of a heat pump. With a packaged unit, all components are combined in an outdoor unit that may be located on the roof or next to the house.

The most efficient air conditioners today use 30-50% less energy as air conditioners from the mid 1970's. Even replacing a 10 year old air conditioner has the potential to save you 20-40% of cooling costs. See the Energy Savers for more detailed information.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be AHRI Certified and AHRI number must be provided.
  2. Product must meet ENERGY STAR certification requirements:

    • Split: SEER ≥ 14.5 and EER ≥ 12.
    • Package: SEER ≥ 14 and ≥ EER 11.
  3. Must replace an existing product.
  4. Installed per manufacturer specs.

Close
Duct Replacement
Duct Replacement

Homes with central furnaces and air conditioners or heat pumps use a duct system to supply heated or cooled air to the various rooms of the house and then return the air to the system for reheating or recooling. There are many points where ducts are connected to something else - to the air handler, to other pieces of ductwork, to the returns that supply air in and out of the rooms in the house, and so on. Ductwork should be properly sealed in all these places in order to prevent the loss of heated or cooled air as your HVAC system has to produce more to make up for those losses.

A 90% efficient furnace combined with an inefficient, leaky duct system equals an inefficient system that costs you money. A typical US home loses 20% of heated or cooled air through leaks, holes and poorly connected ducts, and energy contractors report seeing some homes with 50-80% leakage. See the Energy Star website for more detailed information.

The HERO Program requires HERS testing with duct sealing both before and after the work is completed in order to show the resulting improvement.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

Duct Replacement

Duct Replacement

Homes with central furnaces and air conditioners or heat pumps use a duct system to supply heated or cooled air to the various rooms of the house and then return the air to the system for reheating or recooling. There are many points where ducts are connected to something else - to the air handler, to other pieces of ductwork, to the returns that supply air in and out of the rooms in the house, and so on. Ductwork should be properly sealed in all these places in order to prevent the loss of heated or cooled air as your HVAC system has to produce more to make up for those losses.

A 90% efficient furnace combined with an inefficient, leaky duct system equals an inefficient system that costs you money. A typical US home loses 20% of heated or cooled air through leaks, holes and poorly connected ducts, and energy contractors report seeing some homes with 50-80% leakage. See the Energy Star website for more detailed information.

The HERO Program requires HERS testing with duct sealing both before and after the work is completed in order to show the resulting improvement.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

Specification

  1. Duct system leakage:

    • Partial Replacement: ≤ 15% total system nominal flow
    • Full Replacement: ≤ 6% total system nominal flow
  2. Duct Insulation R-Value ≥ R-6.
  3. Installed per Title 24, Part 6.

Close
Evaporative Cooler
Evaporative Cooler

Evaporative coolers cool outdoor air by passing it over water-soaked pads, which can lower the air's temperature by 15-40 degrees. Evaporative coolers are installed as an alternative to air conditioners in low-humidity areas because they cost about 50% less to install and use about 25% of the energy. They do, however, require more frequent maintenance and windows must be partly opened to allow the warmer air indoors to escape as it is replaced by cooled air from the evaporative cooler. This also means that fresh air is constantly circulating in contrast to the recirculated air that is used in a central air conditioner.

Two stage evaporative coolers are often more efficient both as to energy and water usage, which is important in hotter, drier climates, and don't add as much humidity to the home as a single stage cooler would. In addition, choosing one with a vent-only option would allow the evaporative cooler to be used as a whole house fan during milder weather. (Energy Savers)

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Evaporative Cooler

Evaporative Cooler

Evaporative coolers cool outdoor air by passing it over water-soaked pads, which can lower the air's temperature by 15-40 degrees. Evaporative coolers are installed as an alternative to air conditioners in low-humidity areas because they cost about 50% less to install and use about 25% of the energy. They do, however, require more frequent maintenance and windows must be partly opened to allow the warmer air indoors to escape as it is replaced by cooled air from the evaporative cooler. This also means that fresh air is constantly circulating in contrast to the recirculated air that is used in a central air conditioner.

Two stage evaporative coolers are often more efficient both as to energy and water usage, which is important in hotter, drier climates, and don't add as much humidity to the home as a single stage cooler would. In addition, choosing one with a vent-only option would allow the evaporative cooler to be used as a whole house fan during milder weather. (Energy Savers)

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be listed in California Energy Commission Appliance Efficiency Database.
  2. Product must have separate ducting system, independent of the air conditioning and heating duct system.
  3. Product must be permanently installed through wall or on the roof; window installed product is not eligible.
  4. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Furnace
Furnace

Most homes in the US are heated by central furnaces or boilers. Furnaces heat air and distribute the air through a system of ducts.

The efficiency rating for a furnace is measured by annual fuel utilization efficiency or AFUE, which is the ratio of heat produced for the home to use compared to the total energy consumed by the furnace. For example, a furnace with a 90% AFUE rating means that 90% of the total energy consumed can be used by the home for heating and 10% is lost to the atmosphere. The current federal minimum AFUE for non-condensing, fossil-fueled furnaces is 78%. Replacing an existing 60% AFUE furnace with a 90% AFUE furnace can save you 33% on your heating costs!

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Furnace

Furnace

Most homes in the US are heated by central furnaces or boilers. Furnaces heat air and distribute the air through a system of ducts.

The efficiency rating for a furnace is measured by annual fuel utilization efficiency or AFUE, which is the ratio of heat produced for the home to use compared to the total energy consumed by the furnace. For example, a furnace with a 90% AFUE rating means that 90% of the total energy consumed can be used by the home for heating and 10% is lost to the atmosphere. The current federal minimum AFUE for non-condensing, fossil-fueled furnaces is 78%. Replacing an existing 60% AFUE furnace with a 90% AFUE furnace can save you 33% on your heating costs!

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be AHRI Certified.
  2. Product must meet one of the following efficiency requirements:
    • AFUE ≥ 80% with an ECM, or
    • AFUE ≥ 90%
  3. Product must replace an existing product.
  4. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Geothermal Heat Pump
Geothermal Heat Pump

Ground Source (or Geothermal) Heat Pumps (GSHP) are among the most efficient HVAC and water heating systems available. GSHP's circulate water or refrigerant through looped pipes that are located underground and extract heat from the ground for heating and deliver heat to the ground for cooling, since the ground stays at a relatively constant temperature of between 50 and 60 degrees. While initially more expensive to install than standard systems, they are less expensive to maintain and operate - typical annual energy savings range from 30% to 60% (Energy Savers). Energy Star models are on average over 45% more efficient than standard GSHP's. Please visit Energy Star for additional information.

Unlike other HVAC options, however, GSHP's are considered renewable energy and are therefore eligible for a 30% federal tax credit through 2016. As part of a building retrofit, your contractor must evaluate your property in order to determine if a GSHP is appropriate and which type would work best. The cost of drilling for the pipes will need to be added to the cost of the system and will depend on your particular property. GSHP systems have a lifespan of 25 years or more (with a lifespan of 50+ years for the underground piping) and continue to function at high efficiency in very cold or very hot weather.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Geothermal Heat Pump

Geothermal Heat Pump

Ground Source (or Geothermal) Heat Pumps (GSHP) are among the most efficient HVAC and water heating systems available. GSHP's circulate water or refrigerant through looped pipes that are located underground and extract heat from the ground for heating and deliver heat to the ground for cooling, since the ground stays at a relatively constant temperature of between 50 and 60 degrees. While initially more expensive to install than standard systems, they are less expensive to maintain and operate - typical annual energy savings range from 30% to 60% (Energy Savers). Energy Star models are on average over 45% more efficient than standard GSHP's. Please visit Energy Star for additional information.

Unlike other HVAC options, however, GSHP's are considered renewable energy and are therefore eligible for a 30% federal tax credit through 2016. As part of a building retrofit, your contractor must evaluate your property in order to determine if a GSHP is appropriate and which type would work best. The cost of drilling for the pipes will need to be added to the cost of the system and will depend on your particular property. GSHP systems have a lifespan of 25 years or more (with a lifespan of 50+ years for the underground piping) and continue to function at high efficiency in very cold or very hot weather.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be ENERGY STAR Certified:

    • Closed Loop Water-to-Air: ≥ 14.1 EER and ≥ 3.3 COP
    • Open Loop Water-to-Air: ≥ 16.2 EER and ≥ 3.6 COP
    • Closed Loop Water-to-Water: ≥ 15.1 EER and ≥ 3.0 COP
    • Open Loop Water-to-Water: ≥ 19.1 EER and ≥ 3.4 COP
    • DGX: ≥ 15.0 EER and ≥ 3.5 COP
  2. Product must replace an existing product.
  3. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Heat/Energy Recovery Ventilator
Heat/Energy Recovery Ventilator

Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV) and Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV) products are high-efficiency whole-house ventilation systems that deliver both indoor air quality and energy savings benefits.

An HRV’s fans pull fresh air into a home while simultaneously exhausting stale air from the home. In most installations, the fresh air is delivered to the living room and bedrooms, while the stale air is removed from bathrooms, laundry rooms, and sometimes the kitchen.

Both the fresh air stream and the stale air stream flow through the HRV. The core of the appliance allows some of the heat from the warmer air stream (the stale air in winter, the fresh air in summer) to be transferred to the cooler air stream. In winter, in other words, the appliance “recovers” some of the heat that would have otherwise been exhausted. This heat transfer occurs without any mixing of the two air streams.

An ERV does everything that an HRV does. In addition, an ERV allows some of the moisture in the more humid air stream (usually the stale air in winter and the fresh air in summer) to be transferred to the air stream which is dryer. This transfer of moisture — called enthalpy transfer — occurs with very little mixing of the two air streams.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Heat/Energy Recovery Ventilator

Heat/Energy Recovery Ventilator

Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV) and Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV) products are high-efficiency whole-house ventilation systems that deliver both indoor air quality and energy savings benefits.

An HRV’s fans pull fresh air into a home while simultaneously exhausting stale air from the home. In most installations, the fresh air is delivered to the living room and bedrooms, while the stale air is removed from bathrooms, laundry rooms, and sometimes the kitchen.

Both the fresh air stream and the stale air stream flow through the HRV. The core of the appliance allows some of the heat from the warmer air stream (the stale air in winter, the fresh air in summer) to be transferred to the cooler air stream. In winter, in other words, the appliance “recovers” some of the heat that would have otherwise been exhausted. This heat transfer occurs without any mixing of the two air streams.

An ERV does everything that an HRV does. In addition, an ERV allows some of the moisture in the more humid air stream (usually the stale air in winter and the fresh air in summer) to be transferred to the air stream which is dryer. This transfer of moisture — called enthalpy transfer — occurs with very little mixing of the two air streams.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be certified by the Home Ventilation Institute (HVI)
  2. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Hydronic Radiant Heating
Hydronic Radiant Heating

Radiant heating systems supply heat directly to the floor or to panels in the wall or ceiling of a house.  Radiant heating is more efficient than baseboard heating and usually more efficient than forced-air heating because no energy is lost through ducts. The lack of moving air can also be advantageous to people with severe allergies. Hydronic (liquid-based) systems use little electricity, a benefit for homes off the power grid or in areas with high electricity prices. The hydronic systems can also be heated with a wide variety of energy sources, including standard gas- or oil-fired boilers, wood-fired boilers, solar water heaters, or some combination of these heat sources. (Energy Savers)  Radiant floor heating is not always the most cost effective or energy efficient option with a building retrofit, so discuss with your contractor the cost to install as well as the estimated savings as compared to your current heating system.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy’s Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Hydronic Radiant Heating

Hydronic Radiant Heating

Radiant heating systems supply heat directly to the floor or to panels in the wall or ceiling of a house.  Radiant heating is more efficient than baseboard heating and usually more efficient than forced-air heating because no energy is lost through ducts. The lack of moving air can also be advantageous to people with severe allergies. Hydronic (liquid-based) systems use little electricity, a benefit for homes off the power grid or in areas with high electricity prices. The hydronic systems can also be heated with a wide variety of energy sources, including standard gas- or oil-fired boilers, wood-fired boilers, solar water heaters, or some combination of these heat sources. (Energy Savers)  Radiant floor heating is not always the most cost effective or energy efficient option with a building retrofit, so discuss with your contractor the cost to install as well as the estimated savings as compared to your current heating system.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy’s Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. System must be powered by a high-efficiency HERO-qualified heating source.
  2. Installed per manufacturer specs.

Close
Mini-Split Air Conditioner
Mini-Split Air Conditioner

Mini-Split Air Conditioner, also called mini-splits or ductless cooling systems, are highly efficient products that deliver cool air directly into different zones in your home, instead of routing it through ducts first. They have been around for 30 years and are used widely in international markets. Mini-splits are becoming an increasingly popular, cost-effective solution to replace inefficient window air conditioners and inefficient central cooling systems.

In traditional cooling systems, you generally have one thermostat that controls the temperature of your entire home. With ductless cooling systems, you can have control over the temperature of each zone. Further, with traditional forced-air cooling systems, ducts are used to distribute conditioned air throughout the house. However, about 30 percent of the air that moves through the duct system is lost due to leaks, holes, and poorly connected ducts. With ductless cooling, duct losses are eliminated further improving the efficiency use of electricity to cool the home.

Due to increased efficiency ratings, zonal cooling distribution, variable speed compressors, and elimination of duct system losses, mini-split air conditioner products can deliver up to 30% annual energy savings.

Mini-Split Air Conditioner

Mini-Split Air Conditioner

Mini-Split Air Conditioner, also called mini-splits or ductless cooling systems, are highly efficient products that deliver cool air directly into different zones in your home, instead of routing it through ducts first. They have been around for 30 years and are used widely in international markets. Mini-splits are becoming an increasingly popular, cost-effective solution to replace inefficient window air conditioners and inefficient central cooling systems.

In traditional cooling systems, you generally have one thermostat that controls the temperature of your entire home. With ductless cooling systems, you can have control over the temperature of each zone. Further, with traditional forced-air cooling systems, ducts are used to distribute conditioned air throughout the house. However, about 30 percent of the air that moves through the duct system is lost due to leaks, holes, and poorly connected ducts. With ductless cooling, duct losses are eliminated further improving the efficiency use of electricity to cool the home.

Due to increased efficiency ratings, zonal cooling distribution, variable speed compressors, and elimination of duct system losses, mini-split air conditioner products can deliver up to 30% annual energy savings.

Specification

  1. Product must be certified and listed in the AHRI Certified Product Directory
  2. Product must have a SEER rating greater than or equal to 15.
  3. Product must replace an existing cooling product.
  4. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Mini-Split Heat Pump
Mini-Split Heat Pump

Mini-Split Heat Pumps, also called mini-splits or ductless heating and cooling systems, are highly efficient products that deliver warm or cool air directly into different zones in your home, instead of routing it through ducts first. They have been around for 30 years and are used widely in international markets. Mini-splits are becoming an increasingly popular, cost-effective solution to replace inefficient baseboard electric heating, window air conditioners, and even inefficient central heating and cooling systems.

In traditional heating and cooling systems, you generally have one thermostat that controls the temperature of your entire home. With ductless heating and cooling systems, you can have control over the temperature of each zone. Further, with traditional forced-air heating and cooling systems, ducts are used to distribute conditioned air throughout the house. However, about 30 percent of the air that moves through the duct system is lost due to leaks, holes, and poorly connected ducts. With ductless heating and cooling, duct losses are eliminated further improving the efficiency use of electricity to heat or cool the home.

Due to increased efficiency ratings, zonal heating and cooling distribution, variable speed compressors, and elimination of duct system losses, mini-split heat pump products can deliver up to 30% annual energy savings.

Mini-Split Heat Pump

Mini-Split Heat Pump

Mini-Split Heat Pumps, also called mini-splits or ductless heating and cooling systems, are highly efficient products that deliver warm or cool air directly into different zones in your home, instead of routing it through ducts first. They have been around for 30 years and are used widely in international markets. Mini-splits are becoming an increasingly popular, cost-effective solution to replace inefficient baseboard electric heating, window air conditioners, and even inefficient central heating and cooling systems.

In traditional heating and cooling systems, you generally have one thermostat that controls the temperature of your entire home. With ductless heating and cooling systems, you can have control over the temperature of each zone. Further, with traditional forced-air heating and cooling systems, ducts are used to distribute conditioned air throughout the house. However, about 30 percent of the air that moves through the duct system is lost due to leaks, holes, and poorly connected ducts. With ductless heating and cooling, duct losses are eliminated further improving the efficiency use of electricity to heat or cool the home.

Due to increased efficiency ratings, zonal heating and cooling distribution, variable speed compressors, and elimination of duct system losses, mini-split heat pump products can deliver up to 30% annual energy savings.

Specification

  1. Product must be certified and listed in the AHRI Certified Product Directory.
  2. Product must have a SEER rating greater than or equal to 15.
  3. Product must have a HSPF rating greater than or equal to 8.2.
  4. Product must replace an existing heating or cooling product.
  5. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Ventilation Fans
Ventilation Fans

Installing adequate ventilation helps to alleviate many common household problems. It also helps to control moisture and remove objectionable odors. Well sealed, tight homes may need additional ventilation in order to provide adequate air changes in a home. Ventilating fans are especially common in bathrooms and other areas where moisture control is important. Energy efficient ventilating fans can save up to 65% less energy than standard models, and, if the fan includes a light, can save even more. Please visit Energy Star for additional information.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Ventilation Fans

Ventilation Fans

Installing adequate ventilation helps to alleviate many common household problems. It also helps to control moisture and remove objectionable odors. Well sealed, tight homes may need additional ventilation in order to provide adequate air changes in a home. Ventilating fans are especially common in bathrooms and other areas where moisture control is important. Energy efficient ventilating fans can save up to 65% less energy than standard models, and, if the fan includes a light, can save even more. Please visit Energy Star for additional information.

Estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be ENERGY STAR Certified.
  2. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Whole House Fan
Whole House Fan

Whole house fans are used to replace or supplement central air conditioning when the air outside is cooler than the air inside, usually in the evening and morning. They work best in areas with hot summer days, cooler summer nights and low humidity. Once the temperature cools down outside, whole house fans allow you to open a few windows, turn the fan on and watch the temperature inside the home drop as hot air is pushed out through the attic and roof, and cooler air is drawn in through the windows. In addition, whole house fans generally use 10% of the energy required by a comparably sized central air conditioner. When used properly, they can help to reduce air conditioning bills substantially, including in spring and fall when the air conditioner may become unnecessary. Please visit Flex Your Power for additional information.

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Whole House Fan

Whole House Fan

Whole house fans are used to replace or supplement central air conditioning when the air outside is cooler than the air inside, usually in the evening and morning. They work best in areas with hot summer days, cooler summer nights and low humidity. Once the temperature cools down outside, whole house fans allow you to open a few windows, turn the fan on and watch the temperature inside the home drop as hot air is pushed out through the attic and roof, and cooler air is drawn in through the windows. In addition, whole house fans generally use 10% of the energy required by a comparably sized central air conditioner. When used properly, they can help to reduce air conditioning bills substantially, including in spring and fall when the air conditioner may become unnecessary. Please visit Flex Your Power for additional information.

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this product, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Whole house fan brand and model must be listed in California Energy Commission Appliance Efficiency Database.
  2. Whole house fan must be installed per manufacturer's specifications.

Close
Ceiling Fan
Ceiling Fan

ENERGY STAR Certified Ceiling Fans meet strict energy efficiency guidelines and are 60% more efficient than conventional fan/light units, which can save you more than $15 per year on utility bills. They also use improved motors and blade designs to move air more efficiently, keeping you cooler and more comfortable.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Ceiling Fan

Ceiling Fan

ENERGY STAR Certified Ceiling Fans meet strict energy efficiency guidelines and are 60% more efficient than conventional fan/light units, which can save you more than $15 per year on utility bills. They also use improved motors and blade designs to move air more efficiently, keeping you cooler and more comfortable.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be ENERGY STAR Certified.
  2. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Lighting Controls
Lighting Controls

Lighting comprises approximately 22% of the electricity use in the average California home . As such, lighting controls are a key strategy for reducing residential electricity use. Energy savings from lighting control technologies vary by control type and application, but certainly provide energy savings as compared to standard manual light switch controls.

Lighting controls automatically turn lights on and off as needed. Automatic controls save energy by eliminating energy from being wasted when lighting is not needed. The most common residential lighting controls include:

Dimmers - Provide variable indoor lighting. When you dim light bulbs, it reduces their wattage and output, which helps save energy. Dimmers are inexpensive and provide some energy savings when lights are used at a reduced level.

Motion Sensors - Automatically turn outdoor lights on when they detect motion and turn them off a short while later. They are very useful for outdoor security and utility lighting.

Occupancy Sensors - Detect indoor activity within a certain area. They provide convenience by turning lights on automatically when someone enters a room, and save energy by turning lights off soon after the last occupant has left the room. Occupancy sensors must be located where they will detect occupants or occupant activity in all parts of the room.

Timer Controls - Can be used to turn on and off outdoor and indoor lights at specific times.

Daylight/Photosensors - Can be used to prevent outdoor lights from operating during daylight hours. This can help save energy because users don't have to remember to turn off their outdoor lights. Photosensors sense ambient light conditions, making them useful for all types of outdoor lighting.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Lighting Controls

Lighting Controls

Lighting comprises approximately 22% of the electricity use in the average California home . As such, lighting controls are a key strategy for reducing residential electricity use. Energy savings from lighting control technologies vary by control type and application, but certainly provide energy savings as compared to standard manual light switch controls.

Lighting controls automatically turn lights on and off as needed. Automatic controls save energy by eliminating energy from being wasted when lighting is not needed. The most common residential lighting controls include:

Dimmers - Provide variable indoor lighting. When you dim light bulbs, it reduces their wattage and output, which helps save energy. Dimmers are inexpensive and provide some energy savings when lights are used at a reduced level.

Motion Sensors - Automatically turn outdoor lights on when they detect motion and turn them off a short while later. They are very useful for outdoor security and utility lighting.

Occupancy Sensors - Detect indoor activity within a certain area. They provide convenience by turning lights on automatically when someone enters a room, and save energy by turning lights off soon after the last occupant has left the room. Occupancy sensors must be located where they will detect occupants or occupant activity in all parts of the room.

Timer Controls - Can be used to turn on and off outdoor and indoor lights at specific times.

Daylight/Photosensors - Can be used to prevent outdoor lights from operating during daylight hours. This can help save energy because users don't have to remember to turn off their outdoor lights. Photosensors sense ambient light conditions, making them useful for all types of outdoor lighting.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be compliant with the California Title 20 Appliance Efficiency Regulations.
  2. Product must be listed in the California Appliance Efficiency Database.
  3. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.
  4. Eligible lighting control types include:

  • Automatic Timer
  • Daylight/Photosensor
  • Dimmer
  • Occupant/Motion/Vacancy Sensor

Close
Lighting Fixture
Lighting Fixture

Energy Star Qualified light fixtures are required to use 70-90% or less of the energy used by equivalent standard light fixtures. In addition, Energy Star Qualified light fixtures last 10-25 times longer and come with a manufacturer-backed warranty of at least 3 years.

By replacing the five most frequently used light fixtures in your home with Energy Star qualified models, the average family in the U.S. can save $70 each year in energy costs.

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing these products please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Lighting Fixture

Lighting Fixture

Energy Star Qualified light fixtures are required to use 70-90% or less of the energy used by equivalent standard light fixtures. In addition, Energy Star Qualified light fixtures last 10-25 times longer and come with a manufacturer-backed warranty of at least 3 years.

By replacing the five most frequently used light fixtures in your home with Energy Star qualified models, the average family in the U.S. can save $70 each year in energy costs.

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing these products please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be ENERGY STAR Certified.
  2. Product must meet Title 24, Part 6 requirements.
  3. Product must be permanently installed.
  4. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Automatic Pool Covers
Automatic Pool Covers

Swimming pool owners can significantly reduce swimming pool heating costs and water usage by using an automatic pool cover. Swimming pools lose energy in a variety of ways, but evaporation is by far the largest source of energy loss. Evaporating water requires tremendous amounts of energy. Covering a pool when it is not in one of the most effective means of reducing water loss and pool heating costs.

Automatic covers have permanently mounted reels that automatically cover and uncover the pool at the push of a button. These products provide significant energy and water savings by reducing evaporation when pools are not being used. In addition, they provide a number of additional benefits such as safety and reduced chemical usage.

Go to DOE Energy Savers to learn more.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Automatic Pool Covers

Automatic Pool Covers

Swimming pool owners can significantly reduce swimming pool heating costs and water usage by using an automatic pool cover. Swimming pools lose energy in a variety of ways, but evaporation is by far the largest source of energy loss. Evaporating water requires tremendous amounts of energy. Covering a pool when it is not in one of the most effective means of reducing water loss and pool heating costs.

Automatic covers have permanently mounted reels that automatically cover and uncover the pool at the push of a button. These products provide significant energy and water savings by reducing evaporation when pools are not being used. In addition, they provide a number of additional benefits such as safety and reduced chemical usage.

Go to DOE Energy Savers to learn more.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be an automatically operated swimming pool cover that has been UL certified as meeting the most recent ASTM F1346 Standard Performance Specification for Safety Covers and Labeling Requirements for All Covers for Swimming Pools.
  2. Product must be permanently installed on an existing swimming pool.
  3. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.
  4. Product must be permanently affixed to the property.
  5. Manual swimming pool covers are not eligible.

Close
Electric Heat Pump Pool Heater
Electric Heat Pump Pool Heater

Electric Heat Pump Pool Heaters operate much more efficiently than alternative gas-fired or electric resistance pool heaters. Heat pumps use electricity to efficiently capture heat from the surrounding air and move it from one place to another. They don't generate heat.

As the pool pump circulates the swimming pool's water, the water drawn from the pool passes through a filter and the heat pump heater. The heat pump heater has a fan that draws in the outside air and directs it over the evaporator coil. Liquid refrigerant within the evaporator coil absorbs the heat from the outside air and becomes a gas. The warm gas in the coil then passes through the compressor. The compressor increases the heat, creating a very hot gas that then passes through the condenser. The condenser transfers the heat from the hot gas to the cooler pool water circulating through the heater. The heated water then returns to the pool. The hot gas, as it flows through the condenser coil, returns to liquid form and back to the evaporator, where the whole process begins again.

The energy efficiency of heat pump swimming pool heaters is measured by coefficient of performance (COP). The higher the COP number, the more efficient. CEC Tile 20-compliant product COPs range from 4.0 to 5.05, which converts to an efficiency of 400%–505%. This means that for every unit of electricity it takes to runs the compressor, you get 4–5 units of heat out of the heat pump. At 4.5 COP, the HERO specification targets the top-tier efficiency level of Electric Heat Pump Pool Heaters.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Electric Heat Pump Pool Heater

Electric Heat Pump Pool Heater

Electric Heat Pump Pool Heaters operate much more efficiently than alternative gas-fired or electric resistance pool heaters. Heat pumps use electricity to efficiently capture heat from the surrounding air and move it from one place to another. They don't generate heat.

As the pool pump circulates the swimming pool's water, the water drawn from the pool passes through a filter and the heat pump heater. The heat pump heater has a fan that draws in the outside air and directs it over the evaporator coil. Liquid refrigerant within the evaporator coil absorbs the heat from the outside air and becomes a gas. The warm gas in the coil then passes through the compressor. The compressor increases the heat, creating a very hot gas that then passes through the condenser. The condenser transfers the heat from the hot gas to the cooler pool water circulating through the heater. The heated water then returns to the pool. The hot gas, as it flows through the condenser coil, returns to liquid form and back to the evaporator, where the whole process begins again.

The energy efficiency of heat pump swimming pool heaters is measured by coefficient of performance (COP). The higher the COP number, the more efficient. CEC Tile 20-compliant product COPs range from 4.0 to 5.05, which converts to an efficiency of 400%–505%. This means that for every unit of electricity it takes to runs the compressor, you get 4–5 units of heat out of the heat pump. At 4.5 COP, the HERO specification targets the top-tier efficiency level of Electric Heat Pump Pool Heaters.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be compliant to California Title 20 Appliance Efficiency Regulations.
  2. Product must be listed in the California Appliance Efficiency Database.
  3. Product must have a rated Coefficient of Performance (COP) greater than or equal to 4.5.
  4. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Natural Gas Pool Heater
Natural Gas Pool Heater

Gas-fired pool heaters remain the most popular system for heating swimming pools. Today, you can find new gas-fired heater models with much higher efficiencies than older models. Still, depending on your climate and pool use, they may not be the most energy-efficient option when compared to heat pump and solar pool heaters.

Heater efficiency indicates the percentage of energy the system can use compared to the energy spent. For example, an 80%-efficient heater uses $80 worth of useful heat for every $100 worth of fuel. herefore, it wastes 20% of the fuel. A five to ten year old gas pool heater may be 70-75% efficient, while a ten to twenty year old heater may be 60-65% efficient. Today's market offers some gas pool heaters with efficiencies as high as 89%-95%. If your current heater is 65% efficient and was replaced with a 95% efficient heater, you would save $300 per year for every $1,000 in annual pool heating costs. Energy Savers

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Natural Gas Pool Heater

Natural Gas Pool Heater

Gas-fired pool heaters remain the most popular system for heating swimming pools. Today, you can find new gas-fired heater models with much higher efficiencies than older models. Still, depending on your climate and pool use, they may not be the most energy-efficient option when compared to heat pump and solar pool heaters.

Heater efficiency indicates the percentage of energy the system can use compared to the energy spent. For example, an 80%-efficient heater uses $80 worth of useful heat for every $100 worth of fuel. herefore, it wastes 20% of the fuel. A five to ten year old gas pool heater may be 70-75% efficient, while a ten to twenty year old heater may be 60-65% efficient. Today's market offers some gas pool heaters with efficiencies as high as 89%-95%. If your current heater is 65% efficient and was replaced with a 95% efficient heater, you would save $300 per year for every $1,000 in annual pool heating costs. Energy Savers

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Gas pool heater brand and model must be listed in California Energy Commission Appliance Efficiency Database.
  2. Gas pool heater must have Thermal Efficiency ≥ 83%.
  3. Gas pool heater must be installed per manufacturer's specifications.

Close
Pool Pump
Pool Pump

Many pool owners don't realize how much energy their pool pump may be wasting. Pool pump speeds vary based on the pool's operation. Filtration, for example, only requires half the flow rate of running a pool cleaner. Conventional pool pumps, with only one speed, are set to run at the higher speeds required of the pool cleaner and waste energy during filtration operation by running faster than necessary.

An ENERGY STAR certified pool pump can run at different speeds and be programmed to match the pool operation with its appropriate pool pump speed. The energy saved is considerable; reducing pump speed by one-half allows the pump to use just one-eighth as much energy.

ENERGY STAR certified pool pumps can save you over a thousand dollars over their lifetime, pay for themselves in less than 2 years, and run quieter and prolong the life of your pool's filtering system.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Pool Pump

Pool Pump

Many pool owners don't realize how much energy their pool pump may be wasting. Pool pump speeds vary based on the pool's operation. Filtration, for example, only requires half the flow rate of running a pool cleaner. Conventional pool pumps, with only one speed, are set to run at the higher speeds required of the pool cleaner and waste energy during filtration operation by running faster than necessary.

An ENERGY STAR certified pool pump can run at different speeds and be programmed to match the pool operation with its appropriate pool pump speed. The energy saved is considerable; reducing pump speed by one-half allows the pump to use just one-eighth as much energy.

ENERGY STAR certified pool pumps can save you over a thousand dollars over their lifetime, pay for themselves in less than 2 years, and run quieter and prolong the life of your pool's filtering system.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Pool pump product must be ENERGY STAR Certified:

    • Single Speed Pump: EF ≥ 3.8 for single speed
    • Multi/Variable Speed/Flow: EF ≥ 3.8 for most efficient speed.
  2. Pool pump must replace an existing pool pump product.
  3. Pool pump must be installed per manufacturer's specifications.

Close
Electric Heat Pump Water Heater
Electric Heat Pump Water Heater

For those homes using electricity to heat their water, an electric heat pump storage water heater can be a more efficient source of water heating. Energy Star estimates that these homes will have savings of $300 or more per year, with savings increasing as usage increases. While a qualified heat pump water heater costs more upfront, the savings will pay back the difference in about three years.
Energy Star recommends that heat pump water heaters be installed in interior spaces that remain between 40°-90°F year-round, and provide 1,000 cubic feet of air space around the water heater. They generally don't operate as efficiently in colder spaces, and can cool the spaces they are in. If possible, consider installing in a space with excess heat, such as a furnace room.

Note: A heat pump water heater can be used not only to heat the water for your home, but also to heat your pool. According to SC Edison, a heat pump water heater is much more efficient than gas or standard electric pool heaters. By combining water heater functions, you may be able to further reduce your overall energy costs.

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this improvement, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Electric Heat Pump Water Heater

Electric Heat Pump Water Heater

For those homes using electricity to heat their water, an electric heat pump storage water heater can be a more efficient source of water heating. Energy Star estimates that these homes will have savings of $300 or more per year, with savings increasing as usage increases. While a qualified heat pump water heater costs more upfront, the savings will pay back the difference in about three years.
Energy Star recommends that heat pump water heaters be installed in interior spaces that remain between 40°-90°F year-round, and provide 1,000 cubic feet of air space around the water heater. They generally don't operate as efficiently in colder spaces, and can cool the spaces they are in. If possible, consider installing in a space with excess heat, such as a furnace room.

Note: A heat pump water heater can be used not only to heat the water for your home, but also to heat your pool. According to SC Edison, a heat pump water heater is much more efficient than gas or standard electric pool heaters. By combining water heater functions, you may be able to further reduce your overall energy costs.

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this improvement, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be ENERGY STAR Certified: EF ≥ 2.0.
  2. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Gas Tankless Water Heater
Gas Tankless Water Heater

A tankless, on-demand water heater is just what it sounds like – there is no storage tank with water that is already hot.  Tankless water heaters only heat water when you are ready to use it, but they are able to continuously heat water so that no one runs out of water when they need it.  In addition, they have a longer lifespan than storage water heaters, usually about 20 years. Please visit Energy Star for additional information.

Tankless water heaters do have a limitation on the amount of hot water they can produce (typically 2-5 gallons per minute) when multiple users are demanding hot water simultaneously, thus users with larger simultaneous demands may wish to install more than one heater in order to keep up with their particular needs.  In addition, depending on the building’s layout, installation may be more complicated and expensive for tankless water heaters than they would be if replacing a typical storage water heater with a condensing water heater. Please visit Energy Savers for additional information.

Similar to a gas condensing storage water heater, a tankless water heater allows most users to reduce their natural gas bills by over $100 per year, the equivalent of a 30% savings in water heating energy use.  Families with higher than average usage will have increased savings. Energy Savers estimates that families that use 86 gallons or more per day can acheive additional savings of 8%–14%, with even greater energy savings of 27%–50% if a tankless water heater is installed at each hot water outlet.

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this improvement, please see the U.S. Department of Energy’s Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Gas Tankless Water Heater

Gas Tankless Water Heater

A tankless, on-demand water heater is just what it sounds like – there is no storage tank with water that is already hot.  Tankless water heaters only heat water when you are ready to use it, but they are able to continuously heat water so that no one runs out of water when they need it.  In addition, they have a longer lifespan than storage water heaters, usually about 20 years. Please visit Energy Star for additional information.

Tankless water heaters do have a limitation on the amount of hot water they can produce (typically 2-5 gallons per minute) when multiple users are demanding hot water simultaneously, thus users with larger simultaneous demands may wish to install more than one heater in order to keep up with their particular needs.  In addition, depending on the building’s layout, installation may be more complicated and expensive for tankless water heaters than they would be if replacing a typical storage water heater with a condensing water heater. Please visit Energy Savers for additional information.

Similar to a gas condensing storage water heater, a tankless water heater allows most users to reduce their natural gas bills by over $100 per year, the equivalent of a 30% savings in water heating energy use.  Families with higher than average usage will have increased savings. Energy Savers estimates that families that use 86 gallons or more per day can acheive additional savings of 8%–14%, with even greater energy savings of 27%–50% if a tankless water heater is installed at each hot water outlet.

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this improvement, please see the U.S. Department of Energy’s Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be ENERGY STAR Certified: EF ≥ 0.82.
  2. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Natural Gas Storage Water Heater
Natural Gas Storage Water Heater

Standard storage tank water heaters remain the most popular method of heating water in the home today. A single-family natural gas storage water heater will typically store between 20-80 gallons of ready-to-use hot water and will lose energy keeping the water hot between uses. According to Energy Star, an Energy Star qualified model will usually save about $30 per year, or $360 over the water heater's average 13-year lifetime. Homes or properties with above average usage will have increased savings. Energy Star estimates that the United States could prevent one billion pounds of carbon dioxide from entering the atmosphere per year if everyone purchased an Energy Star qualified model.

When shopping for a gas storage water heater, the energy factor (EF) indicates a water heater's overall energy efficiency. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater is. Please visit Energy Savers for additional information.

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this improvement, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Natural Gas Storage Water Heater

Natural Gas Storage Water Heater

Standard storage tank water heaters remain the most popular method of heating water in the home today. A single-family natural gas storage water heater will typically store between 20-80 gallons of ready-to-use hot water and will lose energy keeping the water hot between uses. According to Energy Star, an Energy Star qualified model will usually save about $30 per year, or $360 over the water heater's average 13-year lifetime. Homes or properties with above average usage will have increased savings. Energy Star estimates that the United States could prevent one billion pounds of carbon dioxide from entering the atmosphere per year if everyone purchased an Energy Star qualified model.

When shopping for a gas storage water heater, the energy factor (EF) indicates a water heater's overall energy efficiency. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater is. Please visit Energy Savers for additional information.

To estimate your potential to save energy and money by installing this improvement, please see the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Saver calculator.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be ENERGY STAR Certified: EF ≥ 0.67.
  2. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
High-Efficiency Faucets
High-Efficiency Faucets

If every home in the United States replaced existing faucets and aerators with WaterSense labeled models, we could save nearly $1.2 billion in water and energy costs and 64 billion gallons of water across the country annually - equivalent to the annual household water needs of more than 680,000 American homes.

High-efficiency faucet fittings use a maximum of 1.5 gallons per minute can reduce a sink's water flow by 30 percent or more from the standard flow of 2.2 gallons per minute without sacrificing performance.

Faucets and faucet accessories—products that can be attached easily to existing faucets to save water—that obtain the WaterSense label have demonstrated both water efficiency and the ability to provide ample flow.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

High-Efficiency Faucets

High-Efficiency Faucets

If every home in the United States replaced existing faucets and aerators with WaterSense labeled models, we could save nearly $1.2 billion in water and energy costs and 64 billion gallons of water across the country annually - equivalent to the annual household water needs of more than 680,000 American homes.

High-efficiency faucet fittings use a maximum of 1.5 gallons per minute can reduce a sink's water flow by 30 percent or more from the standard flow of 2.2 gallons per minute without sacrificing performance.

Faucets and faucet accessories—products that can be attached easily to existing faucets to save water—that obtain the WaterSense label have demonstrated both water efficiency and the ability to provide ample flow.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must meet EPA WaterSense standard.
  2. Product must be listed in the California Appliance Efficiency Database.
  3. Product flow rate must be less than or equal to 1.5 gallons per minute (GPM).
  4. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
High-Efficiency Showerhead
High-Efficiency Showerhead

The average California household could save up to 13,000 gallons per year by installing WaterSense labeled showerheads. Since these water savings will reduce demands on water heaters, they will also save energy. In fact, the average family could save more than 370 kilowatt hours of electricity annually, enough to power a house for 13 days.

On a national scale, if every home in the United States installed WaterSense labeled showerheads, we could save more than $2.2 billion in water utility bills and more than 260 billion gallons of water annually. In addition, we could avoid about $2.6 billion in energy costs for heating water.

Standard showerheads use 2.5 gallons of water per minute (gpm). High-efficiency showerheads use no more than 2.0 gpm. High-efficiency showerheads products provide a satisfactory shower that is equal to or better than conventional showerheads on the market.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

High-Efficiency Showerhead

High-Efficiency Showerhead

The average California household could save up to 13,000 gallons per year by installing WaterSense labeled showerheads. Since these water savings will reduce demands on water heaters, they will also save energy. In fact, the average family could save more than 370 kilowatt hours of electricity annually, enough to power a house for 13 days.

On a national scale, if every home in the United States installed WaterSense labeled showerheads, we could save more than $2.2 billion in water utility bills and more than 260 billion gallons of water annually. In addition, we could avoid about $2.6 billion in energy costs for heating water.

Standard showerheads use 2.5 gallons of water per minute (gpm). High-efficiency showerheads use no more than 2.0 gpm. High-efficiency showerheads products provide a satisfactory shower that is equal to or better than conventional showerheads on the market.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must meet EPA WaterSense standard.
  2. Product must be listed in the California Appliance Efficiency Database.
  3. Product flow rate must be less than or equal to 2.0 gallons per minute (GPM).
  4. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
High-Efficiency Toilet Fixtures
High-Efficiency Toilet Fixtures

According to WaterSense and the EPA, if your toilet is from 1992 or earlier, you probably have an inefficient model that uses at least 3.5 gallons per flush. New and improved WaterSense-labeled models use less than 1.28 gallons per flush - this usage is at least 60 percent less than their older, less efficient counterparts. Compared to a 3.5 gallons per flush toilet, a WaterSense-labeled toilet could save a family of four more than 16,000 gallons of water and $90 or more annually on their water bill, and $2,000 over the lifetime of the toilet. In addition, older toilets may leak (from the tank into the bowl) and can waste up to 200 gallons per day.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the EPA Water Sense or SoCal WaterSmart.

High-Efficiency Toilet Fixtures

High-Efficiency Toilet Fixtures

According to WaterSense and the EPA, if your toilet is from 1992 or earlier, you probably have an inefficient model that uses at least 3.5 gallons per flush. New and improved WaterSense-labeled models use less than 1.28 gallons per flush - this usage is at least 60 percent less than their older, less efficient counterparts. Compared to a 3.5 gallons per flush toilet, a WaterSense-labeled toilet could save a family of four more than 16,000 gallons of water and $90 or more annually on their water bill, and $2,000 over the lifetime of the toilet. In addition, older toilets may leak (from the tank into the bowl) and can waste up to 200 gallons per day.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the EPA Water Sense or SoCal WaterSmart.

Specification

  1. Product must be listed in the CEC Appliance Efficiency Database.
  2. Product must meet EPA WaterSense standards: flow rate ≤ 1.28 GPF.
  3. Toilet and urinals fixtures are eligible.
  4. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Hot Water Delivery System
Hot Water Delivery System

As is well known, a fair amount of water is usually wasted while waiting for hot water to come through the tap. Hot water delivery systems (also known as a hot water re-circulation systems) are designed to re-circulate the cold water in the pipes back to the hot water heater until hot water is available rather than letting it just flow out of the tap. While it is much easier to include this type of system when a home is first built, some systems make water and money savings available to existing homes by retrofitting them with re-circulation technology.

There are three basic approaches to re-circulation systems:

   1. On Demand/Self-Activated (a button is pushed to start the system)
   2. Timer-controlled
   3. Thermostat-controlled

Because Timer-based systems will begin circulating and reheating the water for the set period whether or not the hot water is being used, these systems are usually not recommended for energy conservation reasons. Thermostat-controlled re-circulation systems are also, in general, not recommended for the same reasons. On Demand/Self-Activated systems include a measure of delay with use, but conserve energy as well as save water.

A variety of research reports have been published analyzing the water and energy wasted or saved when considering a hot water delivery system. One report estimated that 20% of hot water usage is wasted while waiting for the hot water to actually come out of the tap. For one newly constructed home, water wasted while waiting for the hot water equaled over 7 gallons in the nearer part of the house to over 10 gallons at the farther side of the house. For another property, water wasted equaled 2.3 to over 4 gallons wasted for each "cold start". Because the current plumbing design has such an impact, a custom analysis of your current hot water use when compared to the estimated efficiency and cost of the proposed system will help you to determine what makes sense for your family.
Hot Water Delivery System

Hot Water Delivery System


As is well known, a fair amount of water is usually wasted while waiting for hot water to come through the tap. Hot water delivery systems (also known as a hot water re-circulation systems) are designed to re-circulate the cold water in the pipes back to the hot water heater until hot water is available rather than letting it just flow out of the tap. While it is much easier to include this type of system when a home is first built, some systems make water and money savings available to existing homes by retrofitting them with re-circulation technology.

There are three basic approaches to re-circulation systems:

   1. On Demand/Self-Activated (a button is pushed to start the system)
   2. Timer-controlled
   3. Thermostat-controlled

Because Timer-based systems will begin circulating and reheating the water for the set period whether or not the hot water is being used, these systems are usually not recommended for energy conservation reasons. Thermostat-controlled re-circulation systems are also, in general, not recommended for the same reasons. On Demand/Self-Activated systems include a measure of delay with use, but conserve energy as well as save water.

A variety of research reports have been published analyzing the water and energy wasted or saved when considering a hot water delivery system. One report estimated that 20% of hot water usage is wasted while waiting for the hot water to actually come out of the tap. For one newly constructed home, water wasted while waiting for the hot water equaled over 7 gallons in the nearer part of the house to over 10 gallons at the farther side of the house. For another property, water wasted equaled 2.3 to over 4 gallons wasted for each "cold start". Because the current plumbing design has such an impact, a custom analysis of your current hot water use when compared to the estimated efficiency and cost of the proposed system will help you to determine what makes sense for your family.

Specification

  1. System must meet the EPA WaterSense Guide for Efficient Hot Water Delivery Systems definition for one of the following water delivery options:

    • Dedicated Recirculation Line
    • Whole House Manifold System
    • Demand-initiated Recirculating System
    • Core Plumbing System
  2. System must meet the requirements of the California Plumbing Code.
  3. System must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Artificial Turf
Artificial Turf

Turf grass is one of the most water-intensive plants in your landscape. Its high water use and frequent maintenance make it a time-consuming and expensive yard option. In fact, the average residential customer spends about 60% of their water on outdoor irrigation.

For the “traditional” green manicured lawn look all year round without using a lot of water, fertilizer or maintenance, artificial turf is a water saving choice. While artificial or synthetic turf is not for every yard, it is another alternative to the water hungry lawn.

The advantages of artificial turf are that it doesn’t need water, fertilizer, or mowing. It holds up to wear and tear far better than natural grass.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Artificial turf manufacturers who would like their turf models added to the HERO eligible product database should submit model technical specification sheets and warranty information to heroproducts@heroprogram.com.

Artificial Turf

Artificial Turf

Turf grass is one of the most water-intensive plants in your landscape. Its high water use and frequent maintenance make it a time-consuming and expensive yard option. In fact, the average residential customer spends about 60% of their water on outdoor irrigation.

For the “traditional” green manicured lawn look all year round without using a lot of water, fertilizer or maintenance, artificial turf is a water saving choice. While artificial or synthetic turf is not for every yard, it is another alternative to the water hungry lawn.

The advantages of artificial turf are that it doesn’t need water, fertilizer, or mowing. It holds up to wear and tear far better than natural grass.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Artificial turf manufacturers who would like their turf models added to the HERO eligible product database should submit model technical specification sheets and warranty information to heroproducts@heroprogram.com.

Specification

  1. Product must be water and air permeable.
  2. Product must be non-toxic and lead free.
  3. Product must be recyclable.
  4. Product installation must carry at least a 10-year warranty.

Close
Drip Irrigation
Drip Irrigation

Drip irrigation is a highly efficient irrigation system that slowly waters the soil directly around the base of individual plants through small pipes and emitters. This minimizes evaporative losses, pooling, runoff and wetting of plant foliage.

According to the Alliance for Water Efficiency, drip irrigation is likely the most efficient method of providing water to trees, crops, gardens and landscapes. While sprinkler irrigation systems typically have an efficiency of between 50% and 70%, the efficiency of a well-designed drip irrigation system can reach nearly 100%, with numerous other benefits as well.

For properties with a previously installed sprinkler system, there are a variety of products available to assist in converting the existing sprinkler heads to drip irrigation outlets.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the EPA Water Sense or SoCal WaterSmart.

Drip Irrigation

Drip Irrigation

Drip irrigation is a highly efficient irrigation system that slowly waters the soil directly around the base of individual plants through small pipes and emitters. This minimizes evaporative losses, pooling, runoff and wetting of plant foliage.

According to the Alliance for Water Efficiency, drip irrigation is likely the most efficient method of providing water to trees, crops, gardens and landscapes. While sprinkler irrigation systems typically have an efficiency of between 50% and 70%, the efficiency of a well-designed drip irrigation system can reach nearly 100%, with numerous other benefits as well.

For properties with a previously installed sprinkler system, there are a variety of products available to assist in converting the existing sprinkler heads to drip irrigation outlets.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the EPA Water Sense or SoCal WaterSmart.

Specification

  1. Product installed be installed in turf, garden, planter, or flower bed area.
  2. Installed per manufacturer specs.

Close
Drought Tolerant Landscaping
Drought Tolerant Landscaping

According to the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, landscape water use accounts for as much as 60-70 percent of the average California residential water bill, with nearly half of this water use wasted through overwatering, runoff, and evaporation.

One of the most water-intensive plants contributing to high landscape water usage is turf grass. Its high water use and frequent maintenance make it an expensive, time consuming, and non-sustainable landscaping option. By replacing turf grass areas with drought tolerant, low water use landscaping options, homeowners can save up to 40-60 gallons of water annually per square foot replaced.

Click here for a full list of eligible drought tolerant landscape options.

Water agencies throughout the state are now offering turf replacement rebates starting at $2.00 per square foot. Click here to find more information about water saving tips and available rebates in your area.

Drought Tolerant Landscaping

Drought Tolerant Landscaping

According to the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, landscape water use accounts for as much as 60-70 percent of the average California residential water bill, with nearly half of this water use wasted through overwatering, runoff, and evaporation.

One of the most water-intensive plants contributing to high landscape water usage is turf grass. Its high water use and frequent maintenance make it an expensive, time consuming, and non-sustainable landscaping option. By replacing turf grass areas with drought tolerant, low water use landscaping options, homeowners can save up to 40-60 gallons of water annually per square foot replaced.

Click here for a full list of eligible drought tolerant landscape options.

Water agencies throughout the state are now offering turf replacement rebates starting at $2.00 per square foot. Click here to find more information about water saving tips and available rebates in your area.

Specification

  1. Product installation area must replace existing live turf grass area
  2. Requested finance amount may include costs related to the following scope of work items:
    • Removal and disposal of existing turf grass material
    • Site preparation for drought tolerant landscaping installation (i.e. grading, weed barrier installation, etc.)
    • Installation of eligible drought tolerant landscaping options (i.e. decomposed granite, permeable pavers, gravel/rock, etc.)
    • Installation or conversion to eligible irrigation options (i.e. drip irrigation, rotary sprinkler nozzles, etc.)

  3. Requested finance amount may not include costs related to the following scope of work items:
    • Installation of live plants or other biodegradable plant material
    • Removal of pre-existing hardscape areas (i.e. patios, driveways, pools, etc.)
    • Installation of landscape water features (i.e. ponds, fountains, etc.)
    • Installation of any other products/features not listed as eligible in specification number 2

  4. All products must be installed to manufacturer specifications and industry best practices

Close
Graywater Systems
Graywater Systems

Highlights from the Alliance for Water Efficiency website:

What does it mean?
"Graywater, (sometimes spelled gray water, grey water or greywater) is untreated wastewater resulting from lavatory wash basins, laundry and bathing. It never contains wastewater from toilets, urinals or any industrial process. Wastewater from kitchen sinks is also often excluded because of the high food and grease content. In most cases, graywater is recovered and used at single-family homes; although green building industry is promoting graywater in multi-family, commercial, and institutional settings as well. In its most common usage, graywater is often coarsely filtered to remove suspended solids, but not treated with sanitizing chemicals and biocides such as chlorine. The lack of biocides dictates that the water must be used immediately, and subsurface irrigation is the predominate use for this water."

How much can I save?
"More than half of the water used inside the home is potential graywater as it drains into the wastewater system. A typical home with older fixtures could generate 35,000 gallons (132.5 m3) of graywater per year while a newer more efficient home could generate 25,000 gallons (94.6 m3) of graywater per year (Aquacraft, Inc. 1999, 2004, 2008). The key to using this resource is separating graywater from the blackwater (water flushed down toilets and urinal) and using the water in a safe and productive manner."

How is it installed?
"Capturing the water requires separate drainlines for the fixtures and appliances generating the graywater. A system to temporarily store the graywater is necessary, along with a pump to convey the graywater to the desired location. Separating the drainlines is relatively easy during new construction, while retrofitting an existing home can be very expensive."

"In many retrofit projects, homeowners have chosen to only capture the wastewater from the clothes washer, because the clothes washer drain line is not permanently connected to the home sewer system, and the washer already has an intergrated pump to convey the graywater to an alternate storage vessel. An older top loading clothes washer alone can generate more than 14,000 gallons (53 m3) of effluent (graywater) per year; adequate for most residential subsurface irrigation needs. This is enough water to irrigate more than 800 square feet (74.3 square meters) of non-turf plants (trees, shrubs, flower gardens, etc) in most climates."

The source of this information, along with more details about graywater is available at the Alliance for Water Effficency.

Graywater Systems

Graywater Systems


Highlights from the Alliance for Water Efficiency website:

What does it mean?
"Graywater, (sometimes spelled gray water, grey water or greywater) is untreated wastewater resulting from lavatory wash basins, laundry and bathing. It never contains wastewater from toilets, urinals or any industrial process. Wastewater from kitchen sinks is also often excluded because of the high food and grease content. In most cases, graywater is recovered and used at single-family homes; although green building industry is promoting graywater in multi-family, commercial, and institutional settings as well. In its most common usage, graywater is often coarsely filtered to remove suspended solids, but not treated with sanitizing chemicals and biocides such as chlorine. The lack of biocides dictates that the water must be used immediately, and subsurface irrigation is the predominate use for this water."

How much can I save?
"More than half of the water used inside the home is potential graywater as it drains into the wastewater system. A typical home with older fixtures could generate 35,000 gallons (132.5 m3) of graywater per year while a newer more efficient home could generate 25,000 gallons (94.6 m3) of graywater per year (Aquacraft, Inc. 1999, 2004, 2008). The key to using this resource is separating graywater from the blackwater (water flushed down toilets and urinal) and using the water in a safe and productive manner."

How is it installed?
"Capturing the water requires separate drainlines for the fixtures and appliances generating the graywater. A system to temporarily store the graywater is necessary, along with a pump to convey the graywater to the desired location. Separating the drainlines is relatively easy during new construction, while retrofitting an existing home can be very expensive."

"In many retrofit projects, homeowners have chosen to only capture the wastewater from the clothes washer, because the clothes washer drain line is not permanently connected to the home sewer system, and the washer already has an intergrated pump to convey the graywater to an alternate storage vessel. An older top loading clothes washer alone can generate more than 14,000 gallons (53 m3) of effluent (graywater) per year; adequate for most residential subsurface irrigation needs. This is enough water to irrigate more than 800 square feet (74.3 square meters) of non-turf plants (trees, shrubs, flower gardens, etc) in most climates."

The source of this information, along with more details about graywater is available at the Alliance for Water Effficency.

Specification

  1. System must meet California Plumbing Code, Chapter 16A.
  2. Product must comply with local code and permitting requirements.
  3. Eligible system types include:

    • Single-Fixture
    • Multi-Fixture Simple (= 250 GPD)
    • Multi-Fixture Complex (> 250 GPD)
  4. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Rainwater Catchment System
Rainwater Catchment System

An inch of rainfall on a 1,000-square-foot house produces about 600 gallons of water. Rain gutters capture the water and direct it to one or more downspouts which connect to a cistern to help water the garden. Many other countries use rain water and rainwater cisterns as one of their main sources of water for both potable and non-potable uses such as irrigation, showering, toilets, and so on.

Cisterns come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Historically, cisterns were built as underground pits lined with stone, mortar, plaster or cement, and topped with a reinforced concrete roof at ground level. Today, there is choice between prefabricated cisterns from cement, fiberglass, or plastic, which are usually placed underground to hide from view and prevent freezing in colder climates, and above ground tanks made of steel or fiberglass. Some of the newest designs use corrugated steel bins lined with plastic (originally created to store grain). Storage capacity also varies from 500 to 10,000 gallons per cistern, although multiple cisterns are often interconnected in large building sites (Alliance for Water Efficiency).

Note: Rainwater may be contaminated by toxins and contaminants on the roof or in transit and should not be used for watering plants that you will consume (such as fruit or vegetable gardens) without a special filtering or treatment system to make the water potable.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the EPA Water Sense or SoCal WaterSmart.

Rainwater Catchment System

Rainwater Catchment System

An inch of rainfall on a 1,000-square-foot house produces about 600 gallons of water. Rain gutters capture the water and direct it to one or more downspouts which connect to a cistern to help water the garden. Many other countries use rain water and rainwater cisterns as one of their main sources of water for both potable and non-potable uses such as irrigation, showering, toilets, and so on.

Cisterns come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Historically, cisterns were built as underground pits lined with stone, mortar, plaster or cement, and topped with a reinforced concrete roof at ground level. Today, there is choice between prefabricated cisterns from cement, fiberglass, or plastic, which are usually placed underground to hide from view and prevent freezing in colder climates, and above ground tanks made of steel or fiberglass. Some of the newest designs use corrugated steel bins lined with plastic (originally created to store grain). Storage capacity also varies from 500 to 10,000 gallons per cistern, although multiple cisterns are often interconnected in large building sites (Alliance for Water Efficiency).

Note: Rainwater may be contaminated by toxins and contaminants on the roof or in transit and should not be used for watering plants that you will consume (such as fruit or vegetable gardens) without a special filtering or treatment system to make the water potable.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the EPA Water Sense or SoCal WaterSmart.

Specification

  1. Sized to hold ≥ 50 gallons at one time.
  2. Must be permanently installed.
  3. Installed per manufacturer specs.

Close
Rotating Sprinkler Nozzles
Rotating Sprinkler Nozzles

Rotating sprinkler nozzles with pressure regulating devices apply water more slowly and uniformly than standard sprinkler heads which helps prevent overwatering and runoff. Instead of an overly strong, solid spray of water, rotating sprinkler nozzles slowly rotate with multiple, separate trajectory streams of water at an approximate rate of .4 inch per hour rather than a spray's 1.5 inches of water per hour, allowing less water to evaporate and more water to penetrate the ground.

Because more penetrates the ground, rotating sprinkler nozzles with pressure regulating devices are estimated to use 20% less water than conventional spray heads.

SoCalWaterSmart

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the EPA Water Sense or SoCal WaterSmart.

Rotating Sprinkler Nozzles

Rotating Sprinkler Nozzles

Rotating sprinkler nozzles with pressure regulating devices apply water more slowly and uniformly than standard sprinkler heads which helps prevent overwatering and runoff. Instead of an overly strong, solid spray of water, rotating sprinkler nozzles slowly rotate with multiple, separate trajectory streams of water at an approximate rate of .4 inch per hour rather than a spray's 1.5 inches of water per hour, allowing less water to evaporate and more water to penetrate the ground.

Because more penetrates the ground, rotating sprinkler nozzles with pressure regulating devices are estimated to use 20% less water than conventional spray heads.

SoCalWaterSmart

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the EPA Water Sense or SoCal WaterSmart.

Specification

  1. Product must be on SoCal Water Smart Qualified Sprinkler Nozzle product list.
  2. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Weather Based Irrigation Control Systems
Weather Based Irrigation Control Systems

Experts estimate that up to 50% of residential landscaping irrigation is wasted due to overwatering from inefficient irrigation systems. Weather-based irrigation controllers can help to significantly reduce this inefficiency and overwatering issues.

Weather-based irrigation controllers use local weather and landscape conditions to tailor irrigation schedules to actual conditions on the site rather than following the strict, preset schedule set by a clock timer controller.

SoCal WaterSmart estimates that weather-based irrigation controllers offer the opportunity to save an average of 13,500 gallons per year.

WaterSense

SoCalWaterSmart

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the EPA Water Sense or SoCal WaterSmart.

Weather Based Irrigation Control Systems

Weather Based Irrigation Control Systems

Experts estimate that up to 50% of residential landscaping irrigation is wasted due to overwatering from inefficient irrigation systems. Weather-based irrigation controllers can help to significantly reduce this inefficiency and overwatering issues.

Weather-based irrigation controllers use local weather and landscape conditions to tailor irrigation schedules to actual conditions on the site rather than following the strict, preset schedule set by a clock timer controller.

SoCal WaterSmart estimates that weather-based irrigation controllers offer the opportunity to save an average of 13,500 gallons per year.

WaterSense

SoCalWaterSmart

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the EPA Water Sense or SoCal WaterSmart.

Specification

  1. Product must be on the EPA WaterSense qualified product list.
  2. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Solar Inverter
Solar Inverter

Most solar PV systems will include at least one inverter for multiple solar panels. An inverter has several purposes. These major purposes include converting DC power to AC power as well as controlling the voltage, sine curves and number of AC cycles so they are compatible with the building’s more sensitive electronics. Solar PV panels generally produce DC current while buildings (and equipment) in the U.S. typically use AC current, so the inverter and related equipment convert the DC current so it can be used. Also, solar panels produce energy that fluctuates based on the sunlight available, the efficiency of the panel and other factors. Inverters help to manage and stabilize these fluctuations.

For more information, please see Energy Savers.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Solar Inverter

Solar Inverter

Most solar PV systems will include at least one inverter for multiple solar panels. An inverter has several purposes. These major purposes include converting DC power to AC power as well as controlling the voltage, sine curves and number of AC cycles so they are compatible with the building’s more sensitive electronics. Solar PV panels generally produce DC current while buildings (and equipment) in the U.S. typically use AC current, so the inverter and related equipment convert the DC current so it can be used. Also, solar panels produce energy that fluctuates based on the sunlight available, the efficiency of the panel and other factors. Inverters help to manage and stabilize these fluctuations.

For more information, please see Energy Savers.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Inverter must be listed as a California Solar Initiative list of eligible inverters in compliance with CA-SB1 guidelines.
  2. Installation Contractor must be registered with the California Solar Initiative Program and have the correct CSLB licensure to install solar systems.
  3. System must be grid connected unless the property is not currently connected to the grid.
  4. System must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Solar Panel
Solar Panel

Solar photovoltaic systems convert the sun's energy into electricity so that it can be directly used by the house as it is produced. A solar panel is a group of solar cells that collect sunlight and convert it into electricity. The majority of solar panels commercially sold today are constructed using crystalline silicon, but other types are also available. Multiple solar panels (or “arrays”) are required for most buildings in order to meet the partial or full electricity requirements for that building. PV arrays can be permanently fixed, preferably facing south, or installed using a tracking device so the panels follow the sun as it moves. Solar PV systems also generally include an inverter, with one inverter covering multiple panels.

For more information, please see Energy Savers.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Solar Panel

Solar Panel

Solar photovoltaic systems convert the sun's energy into electricity so that it can be directly used by the house as it is produced. A solar panel is a group of solar cells that collect sunlight and convert it into electricity. The majority of solar panels commercially sold today are constructed using crystalline silicon, but other types are also available. Multiple solar panels (or “arrays”) are required for most buildings in order to meet the partial or full electricity requirements for that building. PV arrays can be permanently fixed, preferably facing south, or installed using a tracking device so the panels follow the sun as it moves. Solar PV systems also generally include an inverter, with one inverter covering multiple panels.

For more information, please see Energy Savers.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Panel must be listed as a California Solar Initiative incentive-eligible photovoltaic module in compliance with CA-SB1 guidelines.
  2. Installation Contractor must be registered with the California Solar Initiative Program and have the correct CSLB licensure to install solar systems.
  3. System must be grid connected unless the property is not currently connected to the grid.
  4. System must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Solar Pool Heating Collector
Solar Pool Heating Collector

You can significantly reduce swimming pool heating costs by installing a solar pool heater. They're cost competitive with both gas and heat pump pool heaters, and they have very low annual operating costs. Actually, solar pool heating is the most cost-effective use of solar energy in many climates.

Most solar pool heating systems include a solar collector (heats the water), a filter (removes debris before goes through the collector), a pump (circulates water through the system), and a flow control valve (diverts pool water through the solar collector). In addition, solar collectors are made out of different materials that are more or less appropriate for different climates and different usage patterns.

Collectors for pool heating normally do not require glazing or insulation since they are operated during warmer times of the year. This allows for a simpler design that is far less expensive than domestic hot water collectors. In fact, many collectors are made of heavy duty plastic which is treated with an ultraviolet light inhibitor to extend the life of the panels. The advantages of plastic collectors are that they weigh less than metal collectors and they are much less expensive.

According to Energy Savers, proper maintenance of your system will keep it running smoothly for 10-20 years, and your collector should require little maintenance if the pool's chemical balance and filtering system are checked regularly.

Energy Savers

North Carolina Solar Center

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Solar Pool Heating Collector

Solar Pool Heating Collector

You can significantly reduce swimming pool heating costs by installing a solar pool heater. They're cost competitive with both gas and heat pump pool heaters, and they have very low annual operating costs. Actually, solar pool heating is the most cost-effective use of solar energy in many climates.

Most solar pool heating systems include a solar collector (heats the water), a filter (removes debris before goes through the collector), a pump (circulates water through the system), and a flow control valve (diverts pool water through the solar collector). In addition, solar collectors are made out of different materials that are more or less appropriate for different climates and different usage patterns.

Collectors for pool heating normally do not require glazing or insulation since they are operated during warmer times of the year. This allows for a simpler design that is far less expensive than domestic hot water collectors. In fact, many collectors are made of heavy duty plastic which is treated with an ultraviolet light inhibitor to extend the life of the panels. The advantages of plastic collectors are that they weigh less than metal collectors and they are much less expensive.

According to Energy Savers, proper maintenance of your system will keep it running smoothly for 10-20 years, and your collector should require little maintenance if the pool's chemical balance and filtering system are checked regularly.

Energy Savers

North Carolina Solar Center

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must have the OG-100 Collector Certification by the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC).
  2. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Solar Water Heating System
Solar Water Heating System

According to Energy Star, a solar water heater can cut your water heating bill in half. This means you can save $190 annually if you combine solar with a backup gas-storage water heater instead of using the gas water heater alone. If you have an electric tank water heater for back-up, you'll save about $250 each year on electricity bills. Large families with greater hot water needs can save even more. In addition, the average life expectancy of qualified solar water heating systems is 20 years, much longer than standard gas or electric storage water heaters.

Unlike solar photovoltaic systems, solar water heating systems come in a wide variety of designs. There are choices among types of solar collectors, types of systems (active or passive), and which version of the type of system you choose, depending on your climate, hot water usage and property design. You should talk to several solar contractors about the different options they might recommend for your house before deciding on a solar water heating system.

Most solar water heaters require a well-insulated storage tank. Solar storage tanks have an additional outlet and inlet connected to and from the collector. Since solar water heating systems almost always require a backup system for cloudy days and times of increased demand, conventional storage water heaters usually provide backup and may already be part of the solar system package as a two-tank system or integrated one-tank system. Alternatively, a backup system may be provided as part of the solar collector on the rooftop or through a tankless water heater.

Click here to learn more about solar water heating opportunities for your home.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Solar Water Heating System

Solar Water Heating System

According to Energy Star, a solar water heater can cut your water heating bill in half. This means you can save $190 annually if you combine solar with a backup gas-storage water heater instead of using the gas water heater alone. If you have an electric tank water heater for back-up, you'll save about $250 each year on electricity bills. Large families with greater hot water needs can save even more. In addition, the average life expectancy of qualified solar water heating systems is 20 years, much longer than standard gas or electric storage water heaters.

Unlike solar photovoltaic systems, solar water heating systems come in a wide variety of designs. There are choices among types of solar collectors, types of systems (active or passive), and which version of the type of system you choose, depending on your climate, hot water usage and property design. You should talk to several solar contractors about the different options they might recommend for your house before deciding on a solar water heating system.

Most solar water heaters require a well-insulated storage tank. Solar storage tanks have an additional outlet and inlet connected to and from the collector. Since solar water heating systems almost always require a backup system for cloudy days and times of increased demand, conventional storage water heaters usually provide backup and may already be part of the solar system package as a two-tank system or integrated one-tank system. Alternatively, a backup system may be provided as part of the solar collector on the rooftop or through a tankless water heater.

Click here to learn more about solar water heating opportunities for your home.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. System must have the OG-300 System Certification by the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC).
  2. System auxiliary tank must be residential class.
  3. System must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close
Exterior Doors
Exterior Doors

According to Energy Savers, new exterior doors often fit and insulate better than older types. If you have older doors in your home, replacing them might be a good investment, resulting in lower heating and cooling costs. The R-values of most steel and fiberglass-clad entry doors range from R-5 to R-6 (not including the effects of a window.) For example: A 1-½" (3.81 cm) thick door without a window offers more than five times the insulating value of a solid wood door of the same size.

Glass or "patio" doors, especially sliding glass doors, lose heat much faster than other types of doors because glass is a very poor insulator. Most modern glass doors with metal frames have a thermal break, which is a plastic insulator between inner and outer parts of the frame. Models with several layers of glass, low-emissivity coatings, and/or low-conductivity gases between the glass panes are a good investment, especially in extreme climates. Over the long run, the additional cost is paid back many times over in energy savings. When buying or replacing patio doors, keep in mind that swinging doors offer a much tighter seal than sliding types.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Exterior Doors

Exterior Doors

According to Energy Savers, new exterior doors often fit and insulate better than older types. If you have older doors in your home, replacing them might be a good investment, resulting in lower heating and cooling costs. The R-values of most steel and fiberglass-clad entry doors range from R-5 to R-6 (not including the effects of a window.) For example: A 1-½" (3.81 cm) thick door without a window offers more than five times the insulating value of a solid wood door of the same size.

Glass or "patio" doors, especially sliding glass doors, lose heat much faster than other types of doors because glass is a very poor insulator. Most modern glass doors with metal frames have a thermal break, which is a plastic insulator between inner and outer parts of the frame. Models with several layers of glass, low-emissivity coatings, and/or low-conductivity gases between the glass panes are a good investment, especially in extreme climates. Over the long run, the additional cost is paid back many times over in energy savings. When buying or replacing patio doors, keep in mind that swinging doors offer a much tighter seal than sliding types.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Exterior door products must be NFRC Certified and meet the following requirements:

    • Opaque: U-Factor ≤ 0.21 and SHGC = Any
    • ≤ 1/2-Lite: ≤ 0.27 and SHGC ≤ 0.30
    • > 1/2-Lite: ≤ 0.32 and SHGC ≤ 0.30
  2. Door products must replace existing product; no door additions. 
  3. NFRC label for each different product to be submitted with Completion Certificate.
  4. Product must be installed per manufacturer's specifications.
  5. Product must also meet Title 24 requirements.

Close
Exterior Window Shading Device
Exterior Window Shading Device

Windows play vital roles in our homes: bringing in natural light, connecting us visually with the outdoors, providing fresh air during warm months, helping to slow down heat loss, controlling unwanted temperature increases from sunlight (solar heat gain), and contributing to overall appearance.

Windows’ impact on energy consumption is huge. In older homes, windows typically account for 25% of annual heating and cooling costs but can be responsible for as much as 40%. Solar heat gain from windows can is a primary driver of cooling energy use in California households, particularly in the mild Mediterranean climates where most of the state’s population resides.

According to a 2006 evaluation report prepared by Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory for the California Energy Commission, exterior window shading systems for residential buildings in California climates result in annual cooling energy savings of 20-60%.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Click here to learn more about efficient exterior window shading options.

Exterior Window Shading Device

Exterior Window Shading Device

Windows play vital roles in our homes: bringing in natural light, connecting us visually with the outdoors, providing fresh air during warm months, helping to slow down heat loss, controlling unwanted temperature increases from sunlight (solar heat gain), and contributing to overall appearance.

Windows’ impact on energy consumption is huge. In older homes, windows typically account for 25% of annual heating and cooling costs but can be responsible for as much as 40%. Solar heat gain from windows can is a primary driver of cooling energy use in California households, particularly in the mild Mediterranean climates where most of the state’s population resides.

According to a 2006 evaluation report prepared by Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory for the California Energy Commission, exterior window shading systems for residential buildings in California climates result in annual cooling energy savings of 20-60%.

To check if there are any other incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Click here to learn more about efficient exterior window shading options.

Specification

  1. Product must be permanently secured to the exterior of the property with attachments of fasteners that are not intended for removal.
  2. Product must be installed to provide shading to at least one window or door.
  3. Each product must be one of the following styles:

  4. Other exterior structural elements including, but not limited to, sunroom enclosures, exterior decks, balconies, roof overhangs, detached/free-standing arbors, detached/free-standing pergolas, and/or carports are NOT eligible.
  5. Interior window shading (i.e. blinds, shuttles, shades, curtains, etc.) are NOT eligible.
  6. Product is only eligible to be installed on properties located within California Building Climate Zones 2 and 6-16.
  7. Product is NOT eligible to be installed on properties located within California Building Climate Zones 1 and 3-5.

Close
Exterior Windows
Exterior Windows

Energy Star estimates that replacing existing windows with energy efficient windows can save between 7-15% on energy bills. For California, Energy Star estimates savings of between $71-$146 per year for a typical home, depending on whether you are replacing double pane or single pane windows. In addition, high efficiency windows can help eliminate cold drafts in winter and leaking air conditioning in the summers and keep your home’s temperature more consistently comfortable. Special coatings on the glass will also protect your interior from fading and bleaching.

Energy efficient windows come in a variety of framing materials:

Fiberglass frames are strong, durable, low maintenance, and provide good insulation. Fiberglass frames can be either hollow or filled with foam insulation.

Vinyl frames are low maintenance and provide good thermal insulation. Sections may be hollow or filled with foam insulation. Wide vinyl sills may be reinforced with metal or wood.

Aluminum frames are durable, low maintenance, recyclable, and typically have at least 15% recycled content. Frame design typically includes thermal breaks to reduce conductive heat loss through the metal.

Wood frames are strong, provide good insulation, and are generally favored in historical neighborhoods. The exterior surfaces of many wood windows are clad (or covered) with aluminum or vinyl to reduce maintenance.

Combination frames use different materials separately throughout the frame and sash to provide optimal performance. For example, the exterior half of a frame could be vinyl while the interior half could be wood.

Composite frames are made of various materials that have been blended together through manufacturing processes to create durable, low maintenance, well-insulated windows.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Exterior Windows

Exterior Windows

Energy Star estimates that replacing existing windows with energy efficient windows can save between 7-15% on energy bills. For California, Energy Star estimates savings of between $71-$146 per year for a typical home, depending on whether you are replacing double pane or single pane windows. In addition, high efficiency windows can help eliminate cold drafts in winter and leaking air conditioning in the summers and keep your home’s temperature more consistently comfortable. Special coatings on the glass will also protect your interior from fading and bleaching.

Energy efficient windows come in a variety of framing materials:

Fiberglass frames are strong, durable, low maintenance, and provide good insulation. Fiberglass frames can be either hollow or filled with foam insulation.

Vinyl frames are low maintenance and provide good thermal insulation. Sections may be hollow or filled with foam insulation. Wide vinyl sills may be reinforced with metal or wood.

Aluminum frames are durable, low maintenance, recyclable, and typically have at least 15% recycled content. Frame design typically includes thermal breaks to reduce conductive heat loss through the metal.

Wood frames are strong, provide good insulation, and are generally favored in historical neighborhoods. The exterior surfaces of many wood windows are clad (or covered) with aluminum or vinyl to reduce maintenance.

Combination frames use different materials separately throughout the frame and sash to provide optimal performance. For example, the exterior half of a frame could be vinyl while the interior half could be wood.

Composite frames are made of various materials that have been blended together through manufacturing processes to create durable, low maintenance, well-insulated windows.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Window products must be NFRC Certified and meet the following requirements:

    • U-Factor ≤ 0.32
    • SHGC ≤ 0.30
  2. Window product must replace existing window product; no window additions.  
  3. NFRC label for each different product to be submitted with Completion Certificate.
  4. Product must installed per manufacturer's specifications.
  5. Product must also meet Title 24 requirements.

Close
Skylights and Tubular Daylighting Devices
Skylights and Tubular Daylighting Devices

The improvements in efficiency technologies for windows also apply to skylights, but have a greater effect since they receive direct sunlight in the summer and greater outside/inside temperature differentials in the winter (Energy Star).  A skylight's efficiency is dependent on three components: glazing, operation and use, and shape (Energy Savers).

The energy savings performance of skylights and tubular daylighting devices is based on their U-Factor and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) ratings. For both U-Factor and SHGC raings, the lower the number, the less heat gets out of your home (winter) or comes into your home (summary), and the higher the amount energy savings the product will provide.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Skylights and Tubular Daylighting Devices

Skylights and Tubular Daylighting Devices

The improvements in efficiency technologies for windows also apply to skylights, but have a greater effect since they receive direct sunlight in the summer and greater outside/inside temperature differentials in the winter (Energy Star).  A skylight's efficiency is dependent on three components: glazing, operation and use, and shape (Energy Savers).

The energy savings performance of skylights and tubular daylighting devices is based on their U-Factor and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) ratings. For both U-Factor and SHGC raings, the lower the number, the less heat gets out of your home (winter) or comes into your home (summary), and the higher the amount energy savings the product will provide.

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Skylight and/or TDD products must be NFRC Certified and meet the following requirements:

    • U-Factor ≤ 0.55
    • SHGC ≤ 0.30
  2. NFRC label for each different product to be submitted with Completion Certificate.
  3. Product must be installed per manufacturer's specs.
  4. Product must also meet Title 24 requirements

Close
Window Film
Window Film

Window films are thin layers of polyester, metallic coatings, and adhesives that save energy by limiting both the amount of solar radiation passing through the window and the amount of internal heat escaping. High-reflectivity window film helps block heat gain from direct sunlight during hot summer months. They can be applied directly to the interior surfaces of all types of glass for existing windows.

Window film makes the most sense in hot climates with longer cooling seasons and on windows that are most likely to receive direct sunlight because the film also blocks heat from sunlight during the colder months as well as limits light permeability year round. Energy Savers recommends that east-facing and west-facing windows can benefit most from using window film, that south-facing may benefit somewhat, but may be outweighed by the loss of heat from winter sun, and that north-facing are not likely to derive much benefit at all.  For more information, please see Energy Savers or Energy Star

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Window Film

Window Film

Window films are thin layers of polyester, metallic coatings, and adhesives that save energy by limiting both the amount of solar radiation passing through the window and the amount of internal heat escaping. High-reflectivity window film helps block heat gain from direct sunlight during hot summer months. They can be applied directly to the interior surfaces of all types of glass for existing windows.

Window film makes the most sense in hot climates with longer cooling seasons and on windows that are most likely to receive direct sunlight because the film also blocks heat from sunlight during the colder months as well as limits light permeability year round. Energy Savers recommends that east-facing and west-facing windows can benefit most from using window film, that south-facing may benefit somewhat, but may be outweighed by the loss of heat from winter sun, and that north-facing are not likely to derive much benefit at all.  For more information, please see Energy Savers or Energy Star

To check if there are any incentives or rebates available for this product in your area, please visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE).

Specification

  1. Product must be NFRC Certified.
  2. Product NFRC label must be submitted with Completion Certificate.
  3. Product must be installed per manufacturer specifications.

Close